ESI Q and A Forums Home
 Search       Members   Calendar   Help   Home 
Search by username
Not logged in - Login | Register 
ESI Q and A Forums > ESI Q and A Forum > Questions and discussions for the ESI Q and A Forum > Is it possible for a foal to have epiphysitis in their pastern?

Is it possible for a foal to have epiphysitis in their pastern?
 Moderated by: DrDeb  
 New Topic   Reply   Print 
AuthorPost
kcooper
Member
 

Joined: Mon May 23rd, 2011
Location: High River, Alberta Canada
Posts: 70
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Mon Nov 28th, 2011 04:16 pm
 Quote  Reply 
My 6 month old filly has swelling in the distal area of both of her hind pasterns but one slightly more than the other. She is slightly lame on both but the more swollen one predominantly.

She is in with a stud colt of the same age eating the same feed and he does not have any joint abnormalities or lameness (that I see) but I do notice that they are growing very differently (he's stalky and she is lanky)

Hay: free choice 2nd cut timothy/brome/50% alfalfa
Concentrates: 12% protein foal ration 2 cups (per foal per day)
Exercise: their pen is 60' by 80'

I got her 4 weeks ago and she had never been trimmed or handled much.
She is good with having her front hooves trimmed and I am working on getting her comfortable with her back feet but since they hurt her at the same time I don't want to sour her. I am thinking that we may have to lay her down and trim her backs that way...

Is this as simple as eliminating concentrates and trimming her feet or am I missing something?

I am feeding them less in the way of concentrates then the people I usually go to for questions regarding foal care and feeding recomended...they make their living breeding race/and performance horses... but I still think it is a bit too much sugar and possibly too much protein but yet I wonder how none of their horses are lame and swollen.?

Anyways.... I am wading in biased opinions on the internet and so far have only come across epiphysitis affecting the knee and fetlock. My vet says they feed the same brand I am feeding to their foals although I have not called her about this latest swelling deal yet.

If this is not too off topic I can post a picture?

Last edited on Mon Nov 28th, 2011 04:23 pm by kcooper

DrDeb
Super Moderator
 

Joined: Fri Mar 30th, 2007
Location:  
Posts: 3321
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Mon Nov 28th, 2011 05:58 pm
 Quote  Reply 
Yes, Kim, pictures usually are of assistance.

You should not be feeding any foal anything that would cause it to grow quickly, or in any other manner should you be trying to get the foal to achieve some kind of "maximum size".

You should feed all young horses, after they are weaned, in such a manner that you can always see their ribs. Not skeletal -- but see 'em, and I mean see them in the winter coat and see them from 400 feet away. This needs to be the case until the animals are two years old, after which you may increase their condition score from a 4+ to 5, fully into the 5+ to 6 range, which will cause the ribs to become "just" covered.

This will mean feeding your youngstock what they are intended by their biological nature to eat: grass or grass hay. No grain; very little alfalfa; no pellets; no cubes; no concentrates. In this manner you will raise horses that are sound throughout their lives.

You can post a picture, as I've mentioned, but you also, if there is any lameness or heat involved, need to be calling your veterinarian. Only he or she can tell you through direct examination what is wrong, because this could besides being epiphysitis also be an infection, an injury, or something else. There is a list of possibilities which we will not be able to differentiate on the Internet. -- Dr. Deb

kcooper
Member
 

Joined: Mon May 23rd, 2011
Location: High River, Alberta Canada
Posts: 70
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Mon Nov 28th, 2011 06:26 pm
 Quote  Reply 
Ok here are some pictures.

Yes, I understand and will have my vet come out and have a look. There is no heat with the swelling at this point. I really only just noticed it last week and thought it was likley something to do with how she was growing as opposed to an injury but I will have it checked out. There is no heat with the swelling at this point.
I will remove the foal ration from their diet.

Thank You!

kcooper
Member
 

Joined: Mon May 23rd, 2011
Location: High River, Alberta Canada
Posts: 70
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Mon Nov 28th, 2011 07:12 pm
 Quote  Reply 
Hopefully this goes works

Attachment: 309029_2491124931240_1646250063_2340538_2073528812_n.jpg (Downloaded 151 times)

kcooper
Member
 

Joined: Mon May 23rd, 2011
Location: High River, Alberta Canada
Posts: 70
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Mon Nov 28th, 2011 07:13 pm
 Quote  Reply 

Last edited on Mon Nov 28th, 2011 07:13 pm by kcooper

kcooper
Member
 

Joined: Mon May 23rd, 2011
Location: High River, Alberta Canada
Posts: 70
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Mon Nov 28th, 2011 07:20 pm
 Quote  Reply 
and this one

Attachment: 386766_2491129691359_1646250063_2340540_1448170360_n.jpg (Downloaded 144 times)

DrDeb
Super Moderator
 

Joined: Fri Mar 30th, 2007
Location:  
Posts: 3321
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Mon Nov 28th, 2011 08:02 pm
 Quote  Reply 
Kim, you have a problem both with the inter-phalangeal joint (the "pastern joint"), and also with the metacarpo-phalangeal joint (the "ankle" joint). You need to consult with your veterinarian about this, and also you should not just do what I tell you concerning the feeding -- consult with the vet, and see what they say. But in all likelihood, if the vet is up on the latest research, he or she will also tell you that you need to back off on trying to get maximum growth out of the animal.

Also, by the way, the hooves are grossly out of antero-posteror (AP) balance, so you need to find a farrier who knows how to trim properly. -- Dr. Deb


 Current time is 10:05 pm




Powered by WowBB 1.7 - Copyright © 2003-2006 Aycan Gulez