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Building a Circus Drum
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Kallisti
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Joined: Sat Jun 2nd, 2007
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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 Posted: Sun Aug 1st, 2010 11:41 am
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Hi All,

Am going through the process of getting a pedestal made here in AUS and thought I'd attach the drawings which I'm sending to my tradesman for quote. Hope you can get some use out of the following attachments.

I've asked for a 1m sq top, around 1200mm sq footprint. Indicative price is around $500AUD.

Attachment: pedestal 1.pdf (Downloaded 111 times)

Kallisti
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 Posted: Sun Aug 1st, 2010 11:42 am
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Plan, Elevation and a single Detail

Attachment: pedestal details.pdf (Downloaded 90 times)

Kallisti
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 Posted: Sun Aug 1st, 2010 11:45 am
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3D model and 2D drawings, built in Google SketchUp (free download available).

Attachment: pedestal - sketch up files.zip (Downloaded 90 times)

DrDeb
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 Posted: Sun Aug 1st, 2010 09:47 pm
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Kallisti -- Five hundred bucks is about four hundred and fifty bucks too high. You should be able to build any drum you'll ever need yourself, out of scrap materials that you can find around the farm, the stable, or for low cost at the junkyard.

I understand that plywood and other wood products are quite expensive in Australia, so that should tell you right off the bat not to plan on building a drum primarily out of wood.

The whole idea, and the main idea, of permitting Alan and Adam to post images here is to give you IDEAS -- i.e. the general idea to begin with, and then also in the sense of giving you creative ideas. How can you build a drum that will do the same things as a simple one-horse platform such as shown, yet use other materials? Who says you have to follow their exact pattern, or any pattern ever used by anyone previously?

So you think about the following as possible materials:

An old tree stump, or a section of a log

Cut sections, bundled together, of PVC pipe, plastic plumbing or sewer pipe, 4" diameter or larger, of the heavier-walled type

The aluminum wheel from a large truck (must have no dents), plus enough plywood to make a top and a base (cut the top 1/2 inch larger diameter than the diameter of the wheel, and fix it onto the wheel using bolts and washers).

Cut the "good" sections out of old jump poles, or better, old fenceposts, especially the "treated" type

Dig a hole in the ground large enough to hold a plastic barrel of about the right size. Dig the hole deep enough so that you can sink the barrel into the ground so that 18 inches of the barrel is sticking up. Fill the edges of the hole so that it holds the barrel tightly in place. Then fill the barrel with dirt and gravel. In the last four to six inches, pour in rough cement, the type you use to set fenceposts. Before the slurry fully sets, use a stick to score the top to make a nonslip surface.

Take an old tractor tire and fill it with gravel. Stuff the gravel well in under the rim of the tire as it begins to get full, so you don't have squashy bubbles with no fill under the rubber. When it's as full as you can make it, pour cement in the center so that the pool of cement overlaps the rim of the tire, i.e. at least four inches of cement. Use a stick to roughen the surface before the cement sets.

I think I can promise that even in Australia, none of these types of drum are going to cost you five hundred bucks. I think you could even have a workman make you one by welding it out of scrap iron for less than that. Just make sure if you go that route that there are no sharp edges, and that there is no triangular or other opening into which the horse could stick a hoof. -- Dr. Deb

cdodgen
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Joined: Tue Mar 27th, 2007
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 Posted: Thu Aug 5th, 2010 08:34 pm
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Here are a couple of pics of an $8 USD tire drum.  A client of mine had this old tractor tire lying in her pasture and was more than happy for me to haul it away for her.

A couple of garden cart fulls of sandy loam dirt packed into it and covered with rubber matting, which cost me the $8.   Thought about taking DD suggestion of putting a concrete stop on it, but wanted it to be re-locatable.  It has survived one move and over a two year’s worth of Texas downpours without losing it’s pack dirt.  The only issue I have with it is figuring out a way to attach the matting to the tire so my gelding will stop playing flip the mat.  I’m afraid that any type of metal fastener will cause a puncture hazard to the horses.  As you can see from the left over hay, it also makes a great place to leave a flake of hay for any horse confined to the pen for the day. 

Attachment: Drum-1.jpg (Downloaded 502 times)

Last edited on Thu Aug 5th, 2010 08:35 pm by cdodgen

cdodgen
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 Posted: Thu Aug 5th, 2010 08:45 pm
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Second pic.  No mat, No horse.  Well, maybe just the nose. ;0)

Attachment: Drum-2.jpg (Downloaded 501 times)

Last edited on Thu Aug 5th, 2010 08:45 pm by cdodgen

LynnF
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 Posted: Thu Aug 5th, 2010 10:51 pm
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I've also seen a drum that appears to be a tire rim filled up with concrete.  I don't think it would be very portable though.

Brenton Ross Matthews
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 Posted: Fri Aug 6th, 2010 12:08 am
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LynnF wrote: I've also seen a drum that appears to be a tire rim filled up with concrete.  I don't think it would be very portable though.

Lynne ,I made a tyre rim stand from a Toyota rim with wood topped with rubber attached to the top.

 My other stands are made from steel so strong enough to hold 2 horses but light enough to take to my shows.Both round and rectangle.

  Brenton

Attachment: th_MinlatonShow[1].jpg (Downloaded 497 times)

Brenton Ross Matthews
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 Posted: Fri Aug 6th, 2010 12:10 am
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The rectangle stand

Attachment: th_GawlerShow2008030[1].jpg (Downloaded 489 times)

Brenton Ross Matthews
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 Posted: Fri Aug 6th, 2010 12:12 am
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The round stand

Attachment: DSCN3972.JPG (Downloaded 496 times)

DrDeb
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 Posted: Mon Aug 9th, 2010 10:56 pm
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Thanks very much for posting these, Brenton. Would you have time to snap a photo of the drum you made out of the automobile wheel? We don't have one up and I think that would help people see just what is meant.

Your welded steel equipment is great especially as showing the heavy metal 'webbing' that's been used to cover all gaps and spaces between the legs and the top and base on each piece, so that the horse cannot get a hoof caught anywhere.

That's very important of course, because getting a horse into a wreck is a very quick way to destroy all his confidence, and perhaps, as we know, even make it impossible at any future time to have the animal willingly work with the equipment. Cheers -- Dr. Deb

Brenton Ross Matthews
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 Posted: Wed Aug 11th, 2010 02:06 am
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Hello Dr Deb and members, I hope this photo is OK. The rim is off a Toyote Land cruiser and solid timber is cut to fit flush with the top and rubber is Tech screwed and wired down through the wheelnut holes. I have had no problems with the Tech screws being exposed and stability either.

 A friend of mine in the Snowy Mountains   does shows with his horses too and has welded a wider base to his stand. As the displays are at his place transporting the stands is no problem. The base is then covered with sand so not visible. He usually asks some big strong person in the audience to shift the stand for him, but the person does not realise that they are actually standing on the base and it goes over well when they can not move it.

 He got me with that too when we were doing a performance together with my horses,[and I'm not big and strong !!]

 He has a mule that he puts on the stand and tells the audience that the mule has thick steel shoes on and on the arena fence he has mounted a big lever which he says is connected to a magnet in the stand and this stops the mule from getting off so he swings the lever and the mule will not get off. Some even believe him !!!!

Brenton

Attachment: 016.JPG (Downloaded 402 times)

DrDeb
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 Posted: Wed Aug 11th, 2010 07:05 am
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Brenton, that's as good a story as Leith Ryan's old story about the 'magic halter' that he had -- Leith is an equine dentist that I've known from years, who hails from New South Wales. He has quite the normal Ozzie sense of humor....

....so he was in Denmark one time doing dentistry at this rich dressage queen's barn. And this German lady heard that Leith was going to be there and she put her horses on the ferry and took 'em over to Denmark just so she could be sure to get him to work on them.

Well of course the German lady's WB gelding was not only enormous, but he's a total pig -- pushy and really not a safe horse to handle. Now, Leith has just arrived in Denmark a couple of days before, and on the way up, getting his kit ready, he has purchased this brand-new bright yellow halter, which he has hung up on a peg as he's unpacking his tools and the German lady is coming in to put her horse in the stall. And as she closes the door, she says to him 'this horse attacked and hurt the last dentist who tried to work on him, so good luck'.

Well, Leith thought that was not the best attitude on her part, so he decided to have a little fun at her expense. She had walked out of the barn to have a cigarette with her girlfriends, so while she was gone Leith took the new halter and put it on the horse and then gave the horse a wee short lesson on what it means to have manners.

Ten minutes later, the German lady walks back in, and there is Leith already deep into his work on the horse and the animal standing like a lamb. And the lady expresses astonishment and says 'how did you possibly do that!'

And Leith, wiping his hands on his apron and looking very serious, puts his float in the bucket and comes out of the stall. And he says to her in a low voice, 'look, I know this is real important to you, and I kind of like you so I'll tell you what the secret is.'

And she steps closer, all ready to hear what this secret technique is. 'You see that yellow halter', says Leith pointing to it. 'You see every time I go out of Australia on one of these trips, I get a new halter but before I go, I go over to my buddy the Aboriginal medicine-man, and I have him put the good word on the halter, so that any horse I put it on immediately goes quiet.'

And I'm telling it too short here -- Leith embellished it for all he was worth, and he really got her hooked on and believing him. And he finished by saying, 'now remember, I've told you this but you've got to keep it DEAD SECRET. Don't tell anyone! Promise luv?' and she nods very solemnly....

....ten minutes later Leith gets done with the horse and goes outside the barn to take a little break, and what does he see but the German lady and all of her girlfriends in this huddle, where she's telling them all about the 'magic halter'.

I've also fielded calls from people who wanted to buy rope halters, because they think that's a 'magic' way to get a horse to load in a trailer. Cheers -- Dr. Deb

LynnF
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 Posted: Sat Aug 14th, 2010 03:44 pm
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OK, here's another home made pedestal.  What I thought was a tire rim is in fact a large rubber feed tub filled with concrete.  I got permission from the lady who owns the pic to post it here.  She said she had planned to use the rubber bottom for the horse to stand on, but he preferred the big white spot.  I'm pretty sure Allen will recognize these two.

I have a pedestal that is a big piece of a tree stump.  It works well, but it takes a tractor to move it.

Attachment: Best-Pedestal.jpg (Downloaded 329 times)

Brenton Ross Matthews
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Joined: Sat Oct 27th, 2007
Location: Harrogate South Australia, Australia
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 Posted: Sun Aug 15th, 2010 01:19 am
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LynnF wrote:

I have a pedestal that is a big piece of a tree stump.  It works well, but it takes a tractor to move it.


Hello Lynn,Here are my tree stumps and a tractor is needed here too.

  Brenton

Attachment: Picture from old computer 223.jpg (Downloaded 319 times)


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