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Josh Nichol's DVD
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Delly
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 Posted: Mon Apr 26th, 2010 12:58 am
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I was really keen to purchase Josh's DVD set but unfortunately because their power

system is different from ours (NZ) they cannot supply.  Any ideas (legal) anyone?

 

DrDeb
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 Posted: Mon Apr 26th, 2010 01:12 am
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Delly, Josh's DVD's will play just as well on your player in NZ as they will on my player in the USA, even though they were produced and manufactured in Canada. It has nothing to do with the power supply. If anyone's DVD's do not play well on your machine, it is because your machine does not have a large enough 'chip' on the inside. I advise you to go about among all your friends, seeking different players, until you find one that plays the disks smoothly. This is the only solution; there is nothing wrong with the disks themselves. -- Dr. Deb

AdamTill
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 Posted: Mon Apr 26th, 2010 03:04 am
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Delly wrote: I was really keen to purchase Josh's DVD set but unfortunately because their power

system is different from ours (NZ) they cannot supply.  Any ideas (legal) anyone?

 

I would imagine the issue is the formatting of the discs (PAL for you vs NTSC for us). Even still, some DVD players will do both. Any computer will do both.

For any DVD I own that I value, I convert the DVD to M4V and load it into ITunes on my Mac. Then I can watch bits over my lunch break, without having to bring the discs with me.

The voltage that we use (120V vs your 220V) isn't a factor here - most DVD players can be set for either. Has nothing to do with playback too, as Dr Deb says.

Blueskidoo
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 Posted: Mon Apr 26th, 2010 03:12 am
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The biggest issue may be the DVD region.  North America has a different region code than NZ.  Some players will only play a specific region's disks, though some (called region-less) will play all disks.

There is a program you can download for your computer that will make your computer's player region-less, and there are hacks for some dvd players that will make them region-less.

I don't know if his disks were produced with a region code or not though.

AdamTill
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 Posted: Mon Apr 26th, 2010 03:14 am
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Just a comment for Leah from her other thread - I'd really suggest going to see Josh (or any other of the folks like him) in person if you can...it's really the best way. You can get lots from the DVDs, don't get me wrong, but there's nothing like first hand experience.

For example, intellectually I understand how a horse raises the base of the neck, and lifts through the withers. It's only after Josh was good enough to get on my horse and show me what he meant by that, however and after I was able to get on and feel the difference in the life that resuts, that I got what it FELT like to have a horse do those things.

I swear the difference between what we had been doing and what it felt like to do it properly was like my horse was almost rearing - not in a scary way, but in terms of elevation. Really neat feel, and now I can hunt that feel rather then letting myself try and intellectualize my way there.

It's like folks were saying in another thread, and like Josh mentions himself - there's the head-knowledge side of things, and then there's the subset of things which we can actually apply!

PS - from the above, Macs are already regionless. Not sure about PCs.

Last edited on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 03:15 am by AdamTill

sammy
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 Posted: Mon Apr 26th, 2010 05:19 pm
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Dr Deb, Adam, Pauline (et al)

There have been some really wonderful discussions on this forum recently covering raising the base of the horse's neck, collection and everything related thereto, for which many, many thanks. I have read some of the older ones in the links you gave, Pauline, before (indeed, several times each), but there is always something 'new' to be appreciated as my 'subset' of things I can actually feel and apply in practice slowly grows. Many thanks again for all the fantastic information and, more, for the feeling I get when reading some of these things - it's the same one I have, deep down, when I experience those fleeting moments of absolute connection, or togetherness, or whatever one can call it, with my horse.

Adam - your recent posts about riding with Josh Nichol have sparked a question in my mind on raising the base of the neck. My understanding has been that if I can get the prerequisites in place - the horse and myself working in calmness and release, telescoping of the horse's neck, increasing suppleness, supporting my horse in carrying himself straight - then a basic degree of roundness and raising of the base of the neck 'come along for the ride'. Indeed, this is my experience with my horse, if I am feeling things right! (Would I be correct in thinking that when the horse telescopes the neck, this gesture and the muscle use/release required to make it also cause some degree of raising of the base of the neck?) Then, over time, through correct work the horse gradually gains the strength that will allow his degree of raising of the base of the neck and collection to increase.

You said that Josh was able to get on your horse and cause him to raise the base of his neck to a much greater degree than you had previously experienced. So my question is, can an exceptionally skilful rider induce this instantly in a horse that has not spent many years gaining the necessary strength (many apologies if I am making an incorrect assumption about you and your horse, Adam!)?

Many thanks.

Sammy

Leah
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 Posted: Mon Apr 26th, 2010 06:46 pm
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I can respond about an experience I recently had at a clinic.

My horse is still young and does not have the muscle development yet.

The clinician was able to get total release through twirling the head similar to what Dr Deb shows (or my understanding of it).

He worked with the horse respectfully to get him 100% OK with the new feelings in his body.

After he was soft and supple, he helped him find forward movement (again being 100% ok).

The horse responded immediately with a correct posture that included raising the base of his neck.

Like Adam's experience, I was completely shocked at my horse's ability to find this posture-seemingly on his own. He OFFERED it and it was 'bigger' than anything I have ever felt.

AdamTill
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 Posted: Mon Apr 26th, 2010 07:02 pm
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Hi Sammy,

No appologies necceassary, you can only go by what I've posted here!

In the case of my horse and I, then the short answer is yes...in terms of raising the base of his neck, within 5 mins Josh was able to accomplish much more then I had been able to in the previous couple of years. The difference is that Josh knows exactly what he's looking to reward, and so can be very clear with a horse. I, on the other hand, am still often figuring out what it is that I'm looking for in the first place.

It also depends a lot on the particular horse, I believe. If you were to take a very tight, shut down, mechanical horse, then it would likely take even a good rider a lot to re-inspire the try in the horse. Without try on the part of the critter, then you can't get anything accomplished even if you ask correctly.

Likewise, if the horse is so tight in the topline, it will take a lot of correct work to free up the muscles that are clamping the spine in a hollow condition. If that tightness has become pathological, and there's actual physical damage to accompany that tightness, then the actions are even more difficult.

Now, I'd like to think that Tindur is softer and in better physical shape then a year and a half ago, and even if we did this same trial then we wouldn't get quite the same results, but the fact is that clarity in feel can only help the training process.

Now, this links back well to another discussion, namely the difference between understanding something and being able to put it into practice. Intellectually I understood what I was looking for, but I didn't recognize the feel of what that was. When Josh allowed me to capture that feel more exactly and internalize it, I realized that I had glimpsed it here and there, but since I hadn't been specifically rewarding it, Tindur wasn't offering it under saddle intentionally.

The other piece that had been complicating things was that Tindur tends to be a very movement-first, soften-second kind of horse - what Josh calls a light (as distinct from soft) horse. He's got tons of try, but being light, he'll throw everything  including the kitchen sink at you when you ask him a question. As a result, it can be tricky to reward one specific thing when you're asking a question.

For example, he's become nice and soft to the rein, because I have more clarity in my hands then I do in my legs. However, he'll tend to flee my legs rather then to soften to them. So even if I bump softly with my leg, he'll sometimes go forward, sometimes back, sometimes straight sideways...you get the picture. If he's calm, it's not a big deal, but if he's worried, it can feel like sitting on a powder keg.

Why? Because up until this spring I really struggled with the concepts of bumping with the leg to create softness, and using the leg to bring up life. When it comes down to it, the legs act like a flag does - the intention behind them creates whatever effect you're asking for at the time. I had been overemphasizing the part that brings up the life, to the point where Tindur was starting to flee my leg, and since he was so light, it didn't take much to get a LOT in return (great in a finished horse...tricky at the beginning).  The example I think of is trying to have a conversation with someone who won't let you finish a sentance...halfway through the sentance, they're already trying to guess what's coming.

I had also been overemphasizing backing, and that's where I had felt the lifting sensation. I had been confusing the lifting through the withers with a sensation of falling backwards, and had never truely felt it going forwards...as such, I didn't look for it there.

So, what Josh tasked me with doing afterwards was to pick up a soft feel through the rein, then to start softly bumping with my leg until Tindur came up and "over" the bridle forwards. If he came forward down in the spine, I'd ask him to rebalance, and if he did anything else, I'd just keep bumping. He could scoot sideways, back up, dump a shoulder etc etc (and did all those things), but I wouldn't reward anything other then the soft, elevated start to a nice walk. If he'd ever offered to quit and I knew that I wasn't overfacing him, I'd bump a little stronger with the leg while still(not really an issue), just to say that flat out quitting wasn't an option (always embodying the feel I was looking for from him). It's also emphatically NOT driving a him into a fixed hand!

Now, we can't maintain this for more then a couple of steps, and I don't ask this from every start, but it's been a wonderful way of being able to hunt that elevated feel. It's also a way to start to bring softness where there was too much lightness/quickness before, while I can keep the number of balls that I'm juggling at once to a minimum. At any rate, it's been a great way to learn to "actively" ask for the lifting through the base of the neck. It's also been great to move from a Baucher snaffle to a spanish hackamore when doing this, since he's pretty soft laterally and we're starting to work on more of these sorts of longtiduinal softenings.

The other part that I had been missing was in how I rewarded a nice give through the rein. I've made that into a way of life as of late, but I hadn't been paying close enough attention to HOW I was doing that. I tended to drop the rein when I felt a nice give, but since I did it a bit too quickly, I had been causing my horse to have to catch his balance too much, and consequently probably to have mixed feelings about the release.

The example there that brought things home was a big excercize ball. Josh had each of us sit on the ball with feet off the ground holding a line, and he would hold the other end. After a few exercizes on how to ground through the line into our pelvis', he showed us what happens when he suddenly drops the line. The resulting scramble to catch our balance was surprising, even if there hadn't been much or any "tension", per say, in the rein.

What we needed to do was to feather the release more, which would let our horses come back into their own balance much more gradually. After all, if we're releasing on an improvement, we won't always be in a situation where our horses are completely weightless in the bridle. So, if we release on an improvement in the softness of the rein, but do so by dumping the rein all at once, our horses have to catch their balance, and the experience isn't likely to always be very pleasant.

So, anyway Sammy, I hope that answers your questions. I know I've had lots to chew on!

Cheers,
Adam

AdamTill
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 Posted: Mon Apr 26th, 2010 07:02 pm
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Error

Last edited on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 07:03 pm by AdamTill

Tammy 2
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 Posted: Tue Apr 27th, 2010 03:31 am
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Hi Adam,

This is a great report on what things you have been working on and the realizations.  Thanks for sharing that and it is really nice to read other peoples clinic experiences.

At my clinic I was also playing with what my legs mean to my horse.  To get through to him that it can simply mean to change your thought.  If I am not asking him to move but just bring his thought back to me, I gently bump until his mind returns, then release.  If I am asking for any movement, my energy backed that up.  He has already started to basically recover his mind himself just with the slightest movement of my legs.  This has been a great a-ha for me.  How to prepare your horse before asking anything and have his mind.

To put this to use with his herd boundness, I would ride on the buckle and bump if he was thinking of anything but me.  I have to just sit and have my energy very low and calm as if I am not asking anything of him but his thought.  It is a very interesting exercise.  After he tries this horse, that pile of dirt, the wall, etc. he just started to come to the middle and circle.  Josh said now he does not know what to do so now we will ask something of him as at that point he is looking to me for what to do now.  I call it the lost puppy dog exercise (my name not Josh's).  Well this has been working for me very well.  Especially with the meaning of my legs to him.  Going through his body to get his mind.  This definitely seems to be the key with my horse.  It also defines to him what pressure means which is not to just go or in some horses flee but to come back to me.  

Another thing I have been doing is trying to hard to stop my horse from doing something I do not want.  Such as if his mind was going to leave, I would try to stop him from looking and leaving.  This just created a brace in him of anticipation of being bumped.  I need to let him do things and then say no, and softly recover him.  It is like the child that has to make the mistake to learn.  If you tell them do not touch that as it is hot and you will get burned and then, they touch it anyways.  My horse needs to kind of fall down and then for me to say no, that is not the right answer.  Yet another a-ha.

We also used the back up to get elevation as well as backing in a circle to target one shoulder or the other.  This was a bit confusing for my horse at first as if he was saying "I'm backing, why are you not releasing me"?  But, it is not about backing and he is starting to realize that as I release on the elevation and ask for forward maintaing the elevation, even for a couple of strides.  And yes, another a-ha.

Now, if I can just get our leg yield down !

Happy Riding,

Tammy



 

 

 



sammy
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 Posted: Tue Apr 27th, 2010 06:09 am
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Adam

Thank you so much for your detailed reply, I felt as if I were riding every step with you. This all makes perfect sense - I think I have been on it, but without the level of absolute precision you describe in asking for and rewarding that elevated feel. I think I may have been tending to look for the feel and immediately ask the horse to do something with it, rather than being sure always to give him a soft release  specifically for the feel and then perhaps go on to do something with it. I will check this out today.

Once again, many thanks!

Sammy

Delly
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 Posted: Tue Apr 27th, 2010 10:34 am
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Thanks Dr. Deb  - that is good to hear - I will now order the set.  Thanks also Adam

and Blue.

equus
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 Posted: Fri May 7th, 2010 06:57 pm
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just my two cents on the josh nichols video:  very comprehensive coverage of the groundwork needed to help a horse free-up bracing and tension in the body and mind.  i have a problem with my horse tensing up when i mount.  i think i can now help him to relax and soften more from a bit more groundwork.

while the video was a bit pricey, i believe it was worth the $230.00.  thanks to dr. deb for pointing me to josh nichols, and of course, to just being dr. deb.  i try to check in to this site almost daily.  i am learning so much. thanks also to all who contribute.

 

Leah
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 Posted: Wed May 26th, 2010 11:00 am
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I thought I would add some feedback. I just received my DVD set and am 2/3 through DVD 1

I am very VERY pleased with this set so far. Josh has a different way to communicate ideas that has filled SO many gaps for me on using a round pen.

This is my first experience seeing Josh and WOW-can't wait to see more!


Leah
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 Posted: Wed May 26th, 2010 04:51 pm
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I wanted to give a quick little feedback.

Today I played around with the ideas Josh presents in his first DVD-talking to the horse's mind and his space in the roundpen.

Because I am not very experienced at this I started with just 2 exercises...getting his mind on me and asking him to leave without fear from the pressure.

It was SO fun and worked out beyond my dreams. Hugo offered the most amazing trot-his base of his neck was LIFTED, his back was like a wave, his loins were coiled and legs suspended and reaching up.

I have never seen him move like this-just a simple seemingly small task of engaging his mind to me allowed him to offer this lovely athletic movement with his body.

I have always struggled with using a round pen-Josh's DVD was really amazing to help understand exactly WHY I am in there...

I can't wait to watch more...it has really helped bring so many principles together.

After I rode my in my side pull (from Josh) and worked on the same ideas about keeping his mind....one of the best rides I have ever had.

Thank you for suggesting this series.


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