ESI Q and A Forums Home
 Search       Members   Calendar   Help   Home 
Search by username
Not logged in - Login | Register 

Pregnant mare-- anticipating foal ??
 Moderated by: DrDeb  
 New Topic   Reply   Print 
AuthorPost
Carey
Member
 

Joined: Sat Oct 25th, 2008
Location: Radersburg, Montana USA
Posts: 59
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Fri Dec 18th, 2009 04:15 pm
 Quote  Reply 
I am wondering if you all have a list of recommended reading, or watching  on the topic of foaling, and foal handling.  This is going to be my first baby of my own,  but I have been around other babies being born.  She is just 6 months pregnant now-- and in good spirits,  I have always thought his horse wanted to be a mother.  The baby is going to be a full blood QH.  Thanks - Carey

Allen Pogue
Member
 

Joined: Thu Sep 6th, 2007
Location: Dripping Springs, Texas USA
Posts: 108
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Sat Dec 19th, 2009 03:20 pm
 Quote  Reply 
Hello Carey,

 You have plenty of time to research the available options on how you want to handle the birth of a foal. But it is always a very good idea to do as much with the mare now as you are capable of to get her responsive and easy to handle.

  I am going to paste here an article I wrote a few years ago for a regional horse publication titled:

 Play Now or Pay Later

 Play now or pay later in the horse world really means spending some quality time creatively playing while the young horse is open and receptive to new ideas or struggling to train later, after the horse has matured, out weighs you five to one is ten times stronger than you and has their own ideas about who is in control. Most horses mature enough to begin saddle training have some built in resistance and typically need remedial schooling to overcome acquired bad habits.
    There are many facets of a young horse's mental, social and instinctual make up that can be used to enhance its learning abilities. Relaxation methods, allelomimetic (copy cat) behavior, herd behavior, safety of familiar surroundings, and the desire to nurse, and even the flight reaction are all natural and instinctual behaviors that offer magnified learning opportunities for a trainer/handler. A creative trainer will channel these behaviors to be used as building blocks to help a foal be comfortable, confident, obedient and submissive to the trainer's wishes.
    Enhanced Foal Training is a method to accelerate the learning ability in young horses. Foals are neurologically able to learn shortly after birth and we believe in helping them to develop maximum brainpower before they are old enough to use their horsepower and willfullness against you. The developmental process that we use with our foals includes a reasonable imprinting period shortly after birth followed by daily interaction and the introduction of age appropriate challenges.
    The imprinting takes place shortly after birth with the foal curled up in our lap, with their head up and alert while we sit on a big oversize beanbag in the stall with the mother looking on. The basic goal of this process is to impress the foal that struggling to get away is futile and that our presence is benign. Within a few weeks the foal will quickly outgrow your lap and so they can easily be encouraged to sit next to you and then sit there alone.  This may seem to be a rather odd behavior. But if you think about it is merely a way of reducing or eliminating the flight instinct as the young horse’s first option when presented with some new stimuli.
     When our foals are a few days old we begin to teach them to step up on a low foal-sized platform with first two feet and then with all four. We can then begin to teach a foal to relax through tapping while it is on the pedestal. The association formed with these two steps is very strong and seems to have a lasting effect on a foal's flight instinct. When it has a designated place to flee to, such as a pedestal, the flight instinct is channeled into a useful predictable behavior. Having a safe place to go to fosters relaxation and helps to suppress the flight instinct.
    When training our foals we separate them for short periods from their dam at feeding and play time. The mare is just a few feet away separated by a see-through gate between two adjacent stalls. Of course, they can still see each other for comfort. Separating the two enables the foal to learn to focus on the handler and to begin to think independently. The periods of separation increase gradually as the foal grows and at about six weeks of age, if possible, we school the new foal in close proximity to another young horse that has just recently gone through this process. This is a very effective strategy and streamlines the process to a degree that must be experienced to be believed. The foals we have raised and trained in this way tend to have very long attention spans in comparison to those that are turned out for the first two or three years of life "to learn how to be horse". Our contention is that horses instinctively know how to be horses and what they really need to learn is how to be productively domestic and trainable members of our troupe.
     The goal of early foal training is to carry over the lessons into a young horse's ground school and ultimately saddle and performance training. I have been doing this for over twenty five years and am into the third generation of horses raised this way. We see an increased learning capacity and a better understanding of our requests with our young horses that have been raised with Enhanced Foal Training. 


When schooling an adolescent or adult horse, we place the younger foals around the round pen so they can easily observe the training process. It is proven that young animals learn specific behaviors from their mothers and other herd members. We have had horses in for saddle training just step up on pedestals after watching our Trick Horses. It has been observed and reported back to us that a young Tennessee Walker named who was sent to us for Trick Training, has now completely on his own, taught other horses to step up on his pedestal and to fetch a Frisbee. Allelomimetic or copy cat behavior is a powerful tool. The study of mirror neurons in humans leads us to believe that if we observe others performing an activity or sport that we already fundamentally understand, our performance of that same activity will be somewhat improved. We believe the same is true of horses learning from horses. 
    By the time our foals are a year old, they are well on the road to being seasoned Trick Horses. So what's the advantage? The short answer is--a horse that has learned how to learn while approaching structured behavior and discipline as a form of interactive play is always eager to engage in the next training challenge.
    Isabelle, a four-year-old Lusitano/Arabian that we raised, was purchased by one of our friends. She is a solid Trick Horse and after learning to ground drive had her first lessons under saddle. On the third ride, she became momentarily overwhelmed and so she offered a very interesting learned behavior, she quietly and gracefully laid down. I just sat there, surveyed where my feet and legs were, told her to stay down, and I stepped off.  Her choice of behaviors should be in no way interpreted as willful disobedience or a dangerous resistance. Her action was just a learned behavior surfacing at a time when she felt she needed a way to communicate whatever was going on inside her head. Given a moment to regroup mentally, she rose, shook and was her perfectly normal relaxed self. Time and again, our young Trick Horses that we have started under saddle seemed to have viewed the new training challenges as just one more interesting addition to their repertoire. The confident, obedient, and interested saddle horses I ride today have obviously benefited from their Trick Training.
    Teaching folks how to start their own colts is very much in vogue. We encourage horse enthusiasts to raise a colt to be a willing companion and ultimately a performance horse with a limitless future. Foals are ready to learn almost immediately after birth, why wait for years to educate them?
    Trick Training engages an eager young horse's mind with cognitive challenges and generates self-expression. Most of the ground training skills that are traditionally taught after two years of age are included in Trick Training, and are easily transferable to under saddle skills. But equally important they are as much fun for the handler to engage in as they are for beneficial for the young horse. This combination makes the training progress quickly because it becomes a compelling and positive addition to one’s lifestyle with horses.
When the TWH was here for training we always left a pedestal and a Frisbee with a special leather pick up tab in his corral. Whenever he desired a little human companionship he would pick up his Frisbee, go step up on his pedestal and offer a big salute. He would do this repeatedly until someone would go and play with him! He learned that when he talked, people listened. This made him an incredibly fun horse to spend time with.
     Trick Training young horses is not for everyone. You must first have a burning desire to interact in a meaningful way with your horse and have an incurable penchant for having fun. You must also practice great restraint not to compulsively pull out a stack of pictures when your friends say, "I didn't know you had a horse".  


Allen Pogue

 Dripping Springs, Texas

NOTE: The picture attached shows a 5-year-old child sitting a week-old Arabian foal down onto a bean bag. If she can do this, anybody can. 

Attachment: Sabrina sit foal 2.JPG (Downloaded 378 times)

raprhowe
Member
 

Joined: Wed Dec 16th, 2009
Location:  
Posts: 7
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Mon Dec 21st, 2009 09:47 pm
 Quote  Reply 
Hello Carey,

I'm with Allen in recommending play time.  This goes for both the mom and the foal.  The foal learns quickly from the mare what to be wary of, so investing time socializing your mare pays off with the foal.

Recommended reading is "Blessed are the Brood Mares" by M. Phyllis Lose.  Lots of common sense information for before, during and after foaling.  There is a significant chapter on distocia, and while it's good to bookmark in case of emergency, remember this rarely happens.  It is reassuring to know exactly when you should be calling to wake up your vet, and be ready to go about it. 

Good luck,

Anita Howe

Carey
Member
 

Joined: Sat Oct 25th, 2008
Location: Radersburg, Montana USA
Posts: 59
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Tue Dec 22nd, 2009 03:00 pm
 Quote  Reply 
Thanks for that.  I have watched one of the enhanced foal training videos, or whatever it is called of yours Allen, so that is very helpful.
I do need to be reminded to spend time with the mare,  I get so busy.  I bred her specifically because she has a really good temperament, likes people is easy to ride and train, really likes to go out into the mountains, and is the worlds bests kids horse--I think, and she is 9. Here is a picture of her over the summer.

Attachment: M2U00007 _9__0001.jpg (Downloaded 306 times)

Allen Pogue
Member
 

Joined: Thu Sep 6th, 2007
Location: Dripping Springs, Texas USA
Posts: 108
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Thu Dec 24th, 2009 03:17 pm
 Quote  Reply 
Hello Carey, 

   I am attaching a picture taken about the time we produced the first enhanced foal training video.  The two  foals are ten days and three weeks of age. The larger filly sitting inbetween them is a two year sister of the bay foal.  The foals are very confidently standing on 'their' place (a low platform).

 Sitting down and standing on a platform are two forms of the same exercise. The basic idea is to give the foals a place where they can deal with uncertainty. Normally foals (and most horses) respond to uncertainty by running away and maybe thinking about it later. If you can encourage a horse (of any age)  to think first you have made a huge stride forward in fostering a safer companion and a more reliable mount.

 The chestnut foal is now about seven years old. She has been to the White Mountain Wilderness in New Mexico several times.  On a ride around Nogal peak at about 8000 ft up on a very narrow trail with a steep drop off (and no where else to go) we encountered a band of hikers. They were all equipped with large brightly colored back packs, head scarves, sunglasses etc. One of the horses in the lead panicked spun around and started at high speed back towards the line of horses on the narrow single file trail. Isabelle was in the path this runaway horse and she saved both the rider of the runaway and her rider from a possible serious accident by boldly standing her ground and shouldering into the horse stopping it in it tracks.

 This is a behavior we see all the time when horses have been schooled together on platforms or pedestals. The horse becomes so possessive of 'their' piece of ground that they will strongly defend it. This lesson had been completely ingrained to the point that is is second nature and overrides the flight mechanism.

 So my advice is to start training early, get creative and never stop.

Allen

Attachment: FT4FillysupHassitsm.JPG (Downloaded 278 times)

Allen Pogue
Member
 

Joined: Thu Sep 6th, 2007
Location: Dripping Springs, Texas USA
Posts: 108
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Thu Dec 24th, 2009 07:19 pm
 Quote  Reply 
Hi Folks, I am going to make a guess that a lot of you have never ridden in the mountains, and so when in the previous post I made mention of a narrow trail around a peak you have to use your inagination.

 The picture attached shows Isabelle ( the same horse that was on a platform when she was 10 days old) now about six years of age and in the mountains for the second time. Her owner Mary is mounted and pointing to the trail across the face of White Horse Hill (elevation 9000ft) . Now it appears that she is smiling but I can assure you it is through chenched teeth. Mary has been across the face of this before and is definitely not looking forward with joyous anticipation. She is a trouper though and is facing up to her justifiable fears to make the ascent.

 The track is barely 18 inches wide and so overgrown with tall bunch grass that most of the time you cannot see it from horseback. You have to trust your horse to negotiate it one step at a time. The slope is between 60 and 70 degrees. One misstep and if you started to slide off there is no stopping for about half a mile to the bottom of the canyon.

 This trail is similar to the one I mentioned in the previous post around Nogal peak about five miles further on west along the Crest Trail.

 When riding in these circumstances you have to trust in God, your horse and the training, so it sure pays to spend some time at home making sure that your horse trusts your judgement and has the sensibility to make good decisions on its own when necessary.

Allen .

Attachment: Mary @White Horse Hill.JPG (Downloaded 271 times)

Brenton Ross Matthews
Member


Joined: Sat Oct 27th, 2007
Location: Harrogate South Australia, Australia
Posts: 57
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Thu Dec 31st, 2009 07:52 am
 Quote  Reply 
Allen Pogue wrote:
 Play Now or Pay Later

I love it when I write a long reply then lose it !!!!

  Here goes again

  Like your article Allen and agree.

 When I was breaking full time ,most I preferred the unhandled horse to the BACKYARD spoilt brat.

Just in the last week I have had the 2 extremes . Been handling untouched TB yearlings and older in bad unsafe COW YARDS-in the area lately, and today 2 yearlings that found out that death was not part of the deal and ,with only a bit of loss skin [bad weldmesh steel panels] ended up my mates!. A week ago had a panic call--a Lady's ""FARRIER ''' could not trim the feet of a Backyard spoilt 2 yr old. Not a problem when he realized I was boss and not him,but it is annoying that people let the foal play with them and not the other way--you play with them under your rules.

A couple of photos of horse that I have bred. The two fillies in the middle , now 4 yr olds have been handled from birth and a pleasure to have around,lay down etc. I think when this photo was taken they wer about 4 months old give or take a month or two

  All the best,

  Brenton

Attachment: Picture from old computer 223.jpg (Downloaded 217 times)

Carey
Member
 

Joined: Sat Oct 25th, 2008
Location: Radersburg, Montana USA
Posts: 59
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Thu Dec 31st, 2009 06:26 pm
 Quote  Reply 
I have been sitting on the fence for a while- not sure which way to go in terms of handling young horses.  Mainly because I have had to deal with the spoiled horse and the ones that have not been handled.  I tend to think that the unhandled horse is easier to deal with also than a spoiled one-- but it a different story when you are talking about having a life long partnership with an animal I think.  That is where I am at-  I don't care much about riding for the public these days unless it is a to die for opportunity- Like a classically trained Lusitano, or drop dead gorgeous Warmblood who needs a rider.  I want to raise and train my own-- and I think that is where putting the time in at first pays off.  My 3 year old has had a really good upbringing I think and it is really paying off now that I am riding her a little -- she is just a rock solid horse-  you would not ever think she has only had one summer of riding-- she does better than most peoples long time saddle horses. 

DrDeb
Super Moderator
 

Joined: Fri Mar 30th, 2007
Location:  
Posts: 3309
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Thu Dec 31st, 2009 09:06 pm
 Quote  Reply 
Carey, Brenton, Allen, et al: Brenton has put his finger square onto the main crux of this issue. I would VASTLY prefer that most people not handle their babies, and to follow Ray Hunt's advice, "let a foal be a foal." When the foal has grown up a couple of years, he will have hardened up enough to be able to stand most people.

The reason I say this is experience. While all of what Allen believes and says is true, he continually forgets that he is a man with a special talent, and thus expects other people to be able to do what he finds simple. Allen's talent tells him, without his having to have had lessons in it, when to quit, when to back off, and how to back off without backing down. Also when to go ahead with it, when to apply pressure. Hence, Allen's horses and also Brenton's (Brenton has the same talent) come out to be good citizens.

Now maybe YOU, the reader of this thread, have this talent too. I don't know. What I do know is that this is absolutely not going to happen with most people and my experience with their horses makes the fact abundantly clear. There is no worse pig in God's universe than the horse that has been through the "imprinting" program promulgated by Dr. Robert Miller, whom I am naming at this time for clarity -- I want no further mention of that name here by anyone else, please.

Allen, if you were to take my advice, you would immediately stop referring to what you do as "imprinting", as this is Miller's own term, just as "natural horsemanship" is Parelli's proprietary term, invented by nobody else. Every mention of these terms serves to do nothing but promote these two people whom we do not recommend. So there are commercial and political overtones to the use of these terms and those who choose to use them should be aware of that. Allen, I am sure with your level of literacy and your great tendency to think things through deeply, that you will be able to come up with an alternative term. DO NOT use "imprinting" as a generic term.

And as to the more experienced horsemen and horsewomen who read this Forum: the question to ask yourself is -- do you trust yourself for this. How "small" can you get? Are you able to get as small as a foal is? This is crucial. One of the skills that Harry Whitney has, that anyone who intends to give foals lessons needs to have, is the ability to get small. A foal is a neonate; this is one of the most brutal errors in Miller's system, that it totally ignores this, that the foal's small voice is simply OVERRIDDEN because the perpetrator has his mind so completely upon his own goals. This is why so many of these horses come out to be pushy pigs: what they learned "early" was that you evidently have to SHOUT to make yourself heard by a human.

There is a cure for this error, and it lies at the deepest level in your system of beliefs. When you are handling a foal, you have NO goal, just as when you are handling an adult horse you have NO goal. You are, instead, having a conversation with a creature that has just recently come into this world, whose senses are exquisitely acute, and whose mind and understanding are unformed. In handling a foal, you are primarily working to form the horse's mind and to cause him to understand the ONE GREAT LESSON that should come from the human to the horse. This ONE GREAT LESSON is the SAME -- and equally effective -- whether you teach it to him as an infant or whether you teach it to him at six years old or twenty:

The WHOLE PURPOSE for "starting" a horse is to cause the horse to believe that whatever trouble he gets in, whatever discomfort he may be experiencing, is something that YOU WILL NOTICE AS MUCH AS HE DOES AND TAKE STEPS TO RELIEVE. The ONE GREAT LESSON is that you teach the horse to refer his every trouble to you, as if you were his refuge and his god. And that he shall have no other gods before you.

Can you do this? Can you take this on? This is the question for every horseman, at every stage, working with every horse no matter what age it is. When you take this responsibility on, knowing it for exactly what it is, then you have entered the world of horsemanship.

A great thought to begin the New Year with, in my book. -- Dr. Deb

Indy
Member
 

Joined: Mon Aug 4th, 2008
Location: Pennsylvania USA
Posts: 145
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Fri Jan 1st, 2010 12:04 am
 Quote  Reply 
When I was at the clinic with Tom Curtin, I was so frustrated by how upset my horse gets when another horse gets near her while we are riding. We do great working through obstacles like a bridge or tarp but put some strange horse walking next to us and we have some issues. Tom told me that I needed to prove to her that I wasn't going to get her into trouble. I have been thinking this through and trying out different ideas I have had, and my horse has told me I am wrong each time. After reading what Dr Deb wrote about what starting a horse means, I realize I have been setting her up to "deal with this" time and again. Now I am thinking that I need to move her out of the situation before it happens rather then put her in the situation and then try and convince her she is ok. I caused this issue by putting to much pressure on her. I had spent a lot of time riding with a friend who had a very green horse and who was very nervous. This horse did a good bit of bucking and kicking and I often ended up feeling like we were being a buffer for that horse/rider. I think this is where I let my horse down.

Does this make sense?
Clara

DrDeb
Super Moderator
 

Joined: Fri Mar 30th, 2007
Location:  
Posts: 3309
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Fri Jan 1st, 2010 04:41 am
 Quote  Reply 
Yes, Clara. So another term I would like to see everybody delete from their vocabulary for the New Year is "desensitizing". What you were trying to do when you first put the mare in the situation and then ask her to "deal with it" is desensitizing. Desensitizing is therefore something you never, ever want to do. You see what we choose to say, the very words we choose, are highly important, because they on the one hand reflect the muddiness (or clarity) of our thinking, and on the other hand they also have an effect in creating our actions. So you choose words with precision in horsemanship, even as our elderly teacher did.

So what you do instead of "desensitize" is you educate. And that begins with having a horse that is in a position where it can pay attention to you and learn from you. To be in this position, the horse has to be in a state where his fears and worries are low or absent. Therefore, you get about "so far" from whatever it is that the horse fears, and then you do compel them to look at that thing and think about that thing, because unless they are looking at it they will not be thinking about it. But you do NOT compel them to move closer to it.

And when they have thought about it -- from a safe distance -- then very often they will actually ask you whether they can move closer to it. You will know this also because you will feel the tension in their body get less. So you expect this and foster this and wait for this, and when it happens you are aware of it and you then give permission for them to go closer. And then they will get afraid again and you will wait again, but it is an active waiting where you do demand that they keep their mind on it and not just leave or quit, either physically or mentally.

The key to getting a horse OK with anything is this same conversation. You show the horse what you expect of him, and you mean it. But you also know that YOUR OWN bravery is irrelevant to his condition. He is as brave as he is, and he can be no braver even if you are very brave, or even if you know that the umbrella is really not going to hurt him. He is as coordinated or as agile or as fast as he is, and he cannot change these things, either. If you happen to be coordinated, agile, and fast -- so that for example you are able to repeat complex aids quickly -- that is irrelevant to his understanding of what those aids are supposed to mean and his needs. So whatever you are has to adapt to -- it has to "go to" -- wherever HE is. Our elderly teacher said again and again: "You need to learn to present yourself to the horse in a way that THE HORSE can understand."

The three steps to training are: position; wait; release. So you position the horse where he can be OK but still also think about the thing you want him to do. Then you wait -- this does not mean fall asleep -- because you are waiting for a response, a thought, a statement, a reaction, from the horse. And that response might be "right", in which case you will be PRESENT to promptly reward it. Or it might be "wrong", in which case you ignore it and re-direct his attention to the thing you want him to find. You want to keep him interested so he hunts this thing up, whatever it might be. And you stay present, so that when he does turn the knob on the correct door, then he doesn't find that door locked or you don't slam the door in his face, but instead when he knocks on the right door, you RELEASE. That means: you take his eyes away from the conundrum you've been asking him to solve -- and you also turn and walk away from it -- so that you lower both the mental and the physical pressure. For just asking him to stand at a distance and consider it is itself pressure. For some horses, you standing next to the horse is pressure. The person will often forget this; the horse never does. -- Dr. Deb

 

Indy
Member
 

Joined: Mon Aug 4th, 2008
Location: Pennsylvania USA
Posts: 145
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Fri Jan 1st, 2010 05:37 am
 Quote  Reply 
Dr. Deb,
Thank you for the response. I am excited to work on this. I see that the way I was doing it before was me trying to be brave enough for both of us and expecting her to get to where I was mentally instead of me understanding where she was. With all the pressure I was putting on her, it is amazing she didn't just buck me off somewhere and leave.
Clara

Carey
Member
 

Joined: Sat Oct 25th, 2008
Location: Radersburg, Montana USA
Posts: 59
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Sun Jan 3rd, 2010 07:32 pm
 Quote  Reply 
This is why I am still on the fence anticipating my first foal.  I do not want to raise a spoiled brat, but I also would like to have a horse who gets along well.  Luckily I have a pretty good set up to raise a baby-  I think- one of my considerations in doing this.  The mare and foal will have a lot of land, water and grass to deal with-and I have a barn- and I could probably ignore them and they would be fine.  But things like trailer loading are a necessity if we need a vet- so the sooner that things like that can happen well the better.  I know that most babies will just follow mom on and mom loads well. 
I don't want to desensitize my horse, and I am glad you brought up dropping that term from our vocabulary, Dr Deb.  I just want this horse to be as well adjusted as possible- and have as little negative feelings and experiences  with people as possible. 
I always liked the idea of letting the foal choose to come to you on its own, and I am sure that fits in somewhere. 

Carey
Member
 

Joined: Sat Oct 25th, 2008
Location: Radersburg, Montana USA
Posts: 59
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Sun Jan 3rd, 2010 09:11 pm
 Quote  Reply 
The other thought I have had one this comes from the experience of going to a few different farms over the years looking at young horses.  I ended up buying a yearling a few years back from a man who did interact a lot with his horses early on.  It was really pretty fun to go there,  all his babies and yearlings were curious and not afraid of people at all, they came right up to you, and I was impressed enough that I bought one.  Then I have seen the opposite situation a lot also.  Horses just tossed out together,  the first time interacting with people as weanling-- and they are not curious about people the same way.  I have also been the one to go pull some 2 and 3 year olds out of a pasture, and it can be challenging just to catch them-- let alone trim them load them saddle them etc....  SO I think there is a place for doing some things early on.  I am not one of those people who really has a goal in mind,  I am more the sort that wants it to be better tomorrow.

I wonder really what they did back in the day-  I think most people waited until horses were 4 to ride-- but then they rode them all day-- but they must have been out doing something with them on a regular basis.  

Brenton Ross Matthews
Member


Joined: Sat Oct 27th, 2007
Location: Harrogate South Australia, Australia
Posts: 57
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Thu Jan 7th, 2010 11:28 am
 Quote  Reply 
Just adding to this subject---one of my favorites ! I owned a mare called Moonshot .

 She was owned by a polo player who had a lot of troubles with her and she had suspentury {sp} tendon troubles too.

 We bought her and she became one of my most valuable horses. I won many Campdrafts comps. ,working stockhorse ,workingcowhorse, tentpegging, was an excemptually good pick-up horse at rodeos, 4 -in-hand-harness horse,etc,and I used her drafting cattle at sale yards for many years.

 The reason for saying about her is that she was not a quiet horse. Before we bought her she had a reputation of bucking etc. and even at the end of her carreer you always gave her respect although she was not a dirty horse.

 When I retired her I ran her with a polo sire on another property that I was breaking and training for. Even at her age she had two filly foals. The first ,the manager told us was having trouble drinking  and as I was away Helen spent a couple of days handling the foal putting her on the mare.

 The second foal had no problems and was not touched till about 18 months old.

 The difference in the two fillys was unbelievable. There was only one stallion on this property and the manager assured me the was no mixup with the foals BUT the first foal was chestnut 15.2hh and a very quiet easy going mare.[she was handled when 1 - to 3 days old] the next [-1 year older] was bay 16 hh nearly long enough for two saddles { I do exaggerate !!] wanted to do everything at 90 miles an hour and was not what you would put your pld grandmothesr on for a pleasant ride ,but both won a lot for me and the big mare made a good pick-up horse too.

 The reason I bring this up is that ,except for the initial handling which was limited they both had the same handling  and I can not blame any one else except myself for the way they turned out as no one handled them but me .

 The brown filly in the photo of the four on the stumps is out of the last big mare and she is a pleasure to be around.

Moonshots' early history and breeding was not known but the previous owners that I knew did her no favours, unfortunatelly, but she did me MANY favours and is one of my special  horses that I have had the pleasure owning.

  Brenton 





Attachment: th_HelenonMoonshot---1.jpg (Downloaded 121 times)


 Current time is 03:43 am
Page:    1  2  Next Page Last Page  




Powered by WowBB 1.7 - Copyright © 2003-2006 Aycan Gulez