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Pedestals and Horses
 Moderated by: DrDeb  
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Allen Pogue
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Joined: Thu Sep 6th, 2007
Location: Dripping Springs, Texas USA
Posts: 108
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 Posted: Thu Sep 17th, 2009 02:25 pm
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Sarah was asking about building a circus drum, so I thought to make a new thread taking this subject a bit further,

Hello Sarah,

   I found out a long time ago how useful pedestals can be when training horses.

 At last count we have 27, some in use, some stored to keep them out of the rain (finally) and a complete set that will disassemble so that we can transport them to horse expos.

  Perhaps the most useful one of all is the "agility platform".. This is a multi-level pedestal that is built to look sorta like a  square wedding cake.

 The second one I recently made is big enough so that you can ride a horse up onto it them then turn and climb up to the upper levels.

 The base is 9ft square, it has two lower levels on either side that are 3ft x 9ft.

 The raised center section is divided into three equal parts that are 3ft square.

 If I remember correctly it took 23--10 ft 2x8's and 2-- 10ft 2x6's and 2--8ft 4x4's  also about 75 -- 6"x5/16" carriage bolts plus decking screws. The 36" wide ribber rubber mats were purchased at a trailer sales/repair shop and come on a roll so that you can  cut them to length as needed.

I have another one that has a base that is 6ft square which we use when the horses are in a smaller ring and schooling at Liberty.

 This platform can be built in an afternoon using only a electric handsaw, drill, hammer,wrench, tape measure, and a razor knife. Pretty simple stuff. A router (or horse shoeing file) can also be used to round off all the corners.

Allen

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saffire_100
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Joined: Thu Jan 24th, 2008
Location: High River, Alberta Canada
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 Posted: Thu Sep 17th, 2009 06:40 pm
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Allan:

Your 'agility platform' is amazing!

I just rec'd and watched your DVD "Enhanced Foal Training".  My foal is 4 months old and I did not realize the training had to start from day 1.   Luckily I did things correctly, minus the pedestal training.  

I found the endo tapping fascinating and plan to do some reading on the topic.   I tried it last night with my hand and after about 8 taps, he dropped his head.  this will be helpful with this colt as he and his mom are both higher headed than average.  Do you  have any quick tips how to make the tapping wand you have in the DVD? 

I plan on building a pedestal for my crew.  Would you suggest a shorter one for my colt or can he adapt to the adult sized one?

I absolutely loved your young horses in the DVD.  the little bay was particularly adorable, what a personality!

Can you talk about the pedestal work itself and why it is beneficial for the horse?

Thanks and regards,

Sarah

rifruffian
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Joined: Mon Mar 17th, 2008
Location: United Kingdom
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 Posted: Thu Sep 17th, 2009 09:24 pm
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endo tapping ? what's that ? is there a previous thread about it ?

Last edited on Thu Sep 17th, 2009 09:25 pm by rifruffian

Tutora
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Joined: Fri Sep 5th, 2008
Location: Pennsylvania USA
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 Posted: Fri Sep 18th, 2009 03:02 am
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Hi Allen--I enjoyed your article in the recent Andalusian magazine.

Allen Pogue
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Joined: Thu Sep 6th, 2007
Location: Dripping Springs, Texas USA
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 Posted: Sat Sep 19th, 2009 02:48 am
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Hello Sarah,

  You can make a wand for your horses by removing the leather flap from a flexible riding crop and then attaching a light ball. I use one 2.75" in dia made out of uncoated foam.  However finding a ball that has the weight and density 'right' is a bit of a challenge. You don't want it too heavy, a tennis ball is WAY to hard and heavy. It has to have some bounce, foam rubber is too soft.

 The height of a pedestal can roughly be the height of the horse's knee.  But really it is not the height that is critical. More important is the size. Large and low pedestals are best for initial schooling. Then smaller and taller as the horse gains confidence.

I have had horses that would walk a 5" wide balance beam. Attached is a picture of a set of pedestal showing various shapes.

 One basic reason that pedestal training benefits horses is that perhaps for the first time in any individual horse's life he has a piece of real estate that he can call his own.

 Here is a link to a new video that shows a number of ways that pedestal can be included into a Liberty training session. The only reason much of this is possible is because the horses feel quite comfortable and perhaps 'safe' on their pedestal while all sorts of other things are going on around them.

Allen

 http://www.youtube.com/user/coolhorse1313

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Dorinda
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Joined: Fri May 18th, 2007
Location: Canberra, Australia
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 Posted: Fri Oct 9th, 2009 06:08 am
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Hi Alan

 

I love your pedestals.  I made my pedestal out of piece cut Eucalypt tree that the neighbours had chopped down.  It took me a while to get my mare to hop up but she is now beginning to really enjoy being elevated and looking around.  I love it and so does she. I havw also made a plateform that I can send her onto when running around. She just hops up and comes to a stand still. 

Thanks for starting this thread

Cheers

Dorinda

DrDeb
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 Posted: Thu Oct 15th, 2009 09:27 pm
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Yes, good, Dorinda. I have been telling you guys at the Canberra clinic now for five years that the sooner you would build a pedestal, the better....only two people so far have believed me. I expect this will also help your mare's "brakes-on-all-the-time" thing, too. The pedestal or drum has many, many benefits, not all of which are obvious on the surface at first.

If at all possible, I also want you to sign up to go to the Harry Whitney clinic that is nearest you. Go over to the other thread where it gives signup details, or call Alex Wickham as I know she knows all about it and is going. If it's too late to get a spot as a rider, go as a spectator.

As I said to Alex, it is more important to me that you guys go see Harry than me. So if it is a choice between going to one or going to the other, then you go see Harry. -- Dr. Deb

Dorinda
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Joined: Fri May 18th, 2007
Location: Canberra, Australia
Posts: 43
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 Posted: Thu Oct 15th, 2009 11:25 pm
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Hi Dr Deb

 

Yes I have started telling people how good getting your horse up onto a pedestal is so hopefully there will be a few more here in the Canberra region that will follow it up.

Alex has organised Wayne Anderson to come to Canberra in November but unfortunately we are going away that weekend, but I will see about Harry's clinic schedule.  I think Buck Brannamon also comes to Australia at times.

Cheers

Dorinda

Jeannie
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Joined: Thu May 7th, 2009
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 Posted: Fri Jun 4th, 2010 05:17 pm
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Dr Deb---  I've been paying more attention to how the horse uses his body on the drum, and have a new appreciation for it, since understanding more about the biomechanics of collection.

       In the photo of you and Olliver on the drum in the forum, and in the live sequence on the Conformation Biomechanics DVD program, you can see where he has to lift the base of his neck in order to lift up his front leg. It would make sense that the higher they lift their leg, the more they have to first raise the base of their neck. Then their head kinda hangs there perpendicular. You can see what neck muscles B is using in the photo below.
  
   I was walking around behind B the other day when he was up there when I took a closer look at what his back end was doing while he's up there, and I thought "Look at that angle, interesting". The abdominal muscles must also have to engage, while the back muscles stretch. 

    I tried doing it myself by putting one hand on a surface 11 inches off the floor with my feet back a bit, and when you lift up one arm straight out you feel the stretch through your back and how your heads kinda hangs there if you  keep your neck up and you don't hollow your back. Hah, I also have a better side!

                                                                   Jeannie

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