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newborn with joint laxity
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kwelch
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 Posted: Sat Aug 15th, 2009 02:12 pm
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My Oldenberg/TB colt was born 8/10/09.   He is healthy in every way except for joint laxity in his rearend.  His lumbosacral joint is flexed, hocks appear sickle, fetlocks nearly touching the ground, excessive internal and external rotation of hips etc.   One vet says to keep him stalled so that he will not be at risk of permanent damage due to long bones that are not ossified enought to bear weight.   One vet says turn him out and let mother nature take it's course ie the excercise will help strengthen the tissues.    I'm on the side of mother nature but I don't want to risk damage to the horse if I can prevent it by minimizing weight bearing as much as possible at this stage.

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Last edited on Sat Aug 15th, 2009 02:17 pm by kwelch

fitz
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 Posted: Sun Aug 16th, 2009 10:31 pm
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I've been breeding sporthorses for more than 10 years and we have had 2 colts that started out looking a lot like your foal, one maybe even worse. Both were turned out daily with their dams, actually had a run in situation and both turned out great and sound as adults. These foals change drastically in their first month but it can be tough to believe that now. Take heart, be patient!

Kathy in Iowa
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 Posted: Mon Aug 17th, 2009 04:12 am
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I'm with fitz on this one. Those babies are folded up pretty tightly in mom. The more exercise and movemnet he gets the stronger those stretched little muscles will get. Had one once that looked like it was walking on it's fetlocks....and it almost was. Within a couple weeks that colt was tall and straight All I did was allow it to be a "normal" horse......on pasture and running it's little butt off!

kwelch
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 Posted: Mon Aug 17th, 2009 05:26 pm
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Thanks for the encouraging feedback.  I think I'm with you guys.

DrDeb
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 Posted: Wed Aug 19th, 2009 10:09 pm
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Dear Kwelch: Your baby is not "weight bearing". He isn't bearing any weight except his own, which is small, as nature intended. Therefore, pay attention to the vet that says turn him out. There are two outcomes that are going to occur: either he will straighten up, or he will not straighten up. You will have the opportunity to see changes on a daily basis. If he seems to be moving in the right direction, keep on turning him out with his dam. If limbs or joints seem to be doing something obviously odd, then call the vet and re-evaluate. If you do not permit the bones to "weight bear", i.e. bear the weight of the foal itself, then bones, joints, nor tendons will have any chance of developing normally. -- Dr. Deb

Allen Pogue1
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 Posted: Thu Aug 20th, 2009 03:16 pm
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Hello Kwelch,

  Six or seven years ago we had a Lusitano/Arabian filly born with 'tendon laxity' in the rear legs. It was difficult to watch her sorta flounder around with the fetlocks nearly touching the ground. On our vet's advice we kept her and the mare up in a large stall with a normal amount of shavings. I did take the mare out on a lead and allowed the foal to follow twice a day .. but after a week there was not really much improvement. So I called Dr. Honnas at Texas A&M, a very well staffed teaching vet school. Honnas is their 'leg man' and he told me that the way to treat this is to glue on plastic heel extensions which would support the foal in a way that would allow her to stand correctly.

 We hauled the foal to the vet school the next day, The procedure took about 45 minutes and as soon as the foal stoood up she walked almost completely normally. About 10 days or two-week later I removed the extensions, cleaned off the excess glue and then filed off the toe growth on the hoof, and then replaced the extension.. Left them on for another 2 weeks and removed them for good. the foal was nearly perfect.

 Now years later there is absolutely no clue that she ever had any problem. She has the straightest legs possible.

It is my feeling that if the laxity is excessive or prolonged then intervention should definitely considered. This is a completely non-invasive and sane approach.

Allen

kwelch
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 Posted: Thu Aug 20th, 2009 05:29 pm
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Thanks Dr. Deb,  I will turn the little guy out and see how it goes. I'll keep you posted.    He's not making progress in the stall that's for sure.

DrDeb
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 Posted: Thu Aug 20th, 2009 10:39 pm
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Dear KWelch: Yes; but also consider what Allen P. has said. If glue-ons are practicable for you, I would consult with your vet and consider doing that. As Allen says, it's a sane approach. -- Dr. Deb

saffire_100
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 Posted: Fri Aug 21st, 2009 03:27 pm
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I had the same experience this spring with my colt.   His rear fetlockswere basically on the ground the first day.  I kept him in for the first 24 hours, then turned him out with his dam... within a week he was close to normal.  If your colt does not start making improvements daily, I would definitely agree with Allen and Dr. Deb to intervene.

Sarah


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