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Horse Anatomy Classes
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Mario Richard
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 Posted: Mon Jul 28th, 2008 12:13 pm
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Will there be any Horse Anatomy classes in 2008?

Dr. Deb
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 Posted: Mon Jul 28th, 2008 10:52 pm
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Mario -- Yes, of course, we offer several anatomy sessions each year. Coming up fairly soon we have:

October -- 3rd week in October, 5-day full-body class in southern Alberta. Please contact Dave Elliott by EMailing bitspur@telusplanet.net or (probably better) telephone (403) 394-4172 or (403) 687-3000. This class is almost always full but there may be space. If there's no space, Dave maintains a waiting list.

Late November -- 4th week in November, 5-day full-body class in California. Please contact Debranne Pattillo/Equinology, Inc. by EMailing office@equinology.com. This class credits toward certification in the Equinology program, but anyone is welcome to enroll. They will give you all the specifics when you EMail them, or telephone (707) 884-9963.

Early December -- 1st week in December, 3-day "skeleton" class in California. This class follows the previous after a one-day break. If we get sufficient enrollment to offer this class, we will articulate and mount an actual horse skeleton, which will then become part of our classroom "furniture" or "teaching equipment". Class members do all the work of mounting the skeleton with guidance from me, and at the same time get the opportunity to do intensive and/or comparative study involving not only horse but cat, dog, cow, bear, raccoon, opossum, armadillo, deer, and more. This class also is sponsored by Equinology and they will credit you toward certification if you are on a certification track. To enroll, please contact office@equinology.com or telephone (707) 884-9963.

Thanks for your interest, Mario, and anyone else out there who is reading this. We enjoy having students come visit us from all parts of the world. -- Dr. Deb

Lallanslover
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 Posted: Tue Jul 29th, 2008 02:07 pm
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Just wondering if you will be spending any time in the UK, in the near future, Dr Deb? There is almost no chance of many of us getting out to America anytime soon. I know lots of folks who would also dearly love to learn with you here in the UK, yet have too many commitments to be able to come over to you.
I understand you are very busy, with so many of your own commitments, but rest assured we'd keep you extra busy teaching us if you could join us sometime!

DrDeb
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 Posted: Wed Jul 30th, 2008 04:49 am
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Dear Lallanslover: Very nice of you to invite me. I have said before to other citizens of the U.K. in this Forum that I would be glad to teach you.

I am in the U.K. for the month of September every year at the Roman-era cavalry fort of Vindolanda, in Northumbria. My time while there is 100% occupied, but with about a year's prior notice, I can schedule events either before or after my residency at Vindo.

I currently have no sponsor in the U.K. and this is why there are no announced clinics there. I go to no place without being invited; in other words, I don't come into town like the circus and put up posters. All my events occur solely because people in some place have been interested enough to organize and sponsor. Generally speaking, our objective is simply to break even on expenses, so that big turnouts are not an objective.

Putting on a clinic requires a safe riding area, some kind of covered space that we can use for a classroom (preferably a space that can be darkened so that I can show videotapes, powerpoint slides, etc.); 50% of my clinic is ridden or hands-on, 50% theory. Most importantly, events require a person with energy and commitment who is willing to handle the local publicity so that subscriptions are taken that cover all the expenses and my fees beforehand, so that the sponsor does not lose any money, and may even make some.

It is too late to schedule a riding clinic this year, since I'll be going to Vindo now in just a few weeks. But if you want to do something next year, you may EMail me privately by writing office@equinestudies.org.

Thanks again for your kind invitation. -- Dr. Deb

Lallanslover
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 Posted: Thu Jul 31st, 2008 10:40 pm
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Many thanks for your reply Dr Deb.
I shall put myself to work, to see if I can stir up interest in one of the larger equine related colleges! There are many in the UK, with great facilities suitable for your purpose, who may well be excited to sponsor a visit from you. I'd be more than happy to assist in organising a fruitful visit.
I'll let you know if I have a favourable response to my enquiries.

Northumbria is a wild and wonderful place, I hope you have a lovely time at the fort (I've spent many happy hours along the length of Hadrians wall myself!)...

Mario Richard
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 Posted: Fri Aug 1st, 2008 03:02 am
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Hello Dr. Deb!

Thank you for the reply,

I am greatly interested in your 5 day Horse anatomy class and I am figuring out which one I should attend: the one in Alberta or California.

I got in touch with both places and I learned that the class in California will be dissecting a pony,

Do you know if we're dissecting a pony or a horse in Alberta? I would prefer a horse (if we can still choose) but a pony is still fine for sure.

Also, are the classes, the one in Alberta and California exactly the same?

The one in California is a bit more expensive too, is the cost higher mainly because the course is part of an overall institute ( http://www.equinology.com ) where you can accumulate credits? or why is the course in California more expensive?

Thank you again for your time!

Cheers!

 

Mario

 

 

 

Tammy 2
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 Posted: Fri Aug 1st, 2008 04:20 am
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Dr. Deb your coming to Alberta ??  I did not see this anywhere in your schedule !!  When ?? 

DrDeb
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 Posted: Fri Aug 1st, 2008 08:53 am
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Mario, we are limited by the weight of the specimen. Full-sized horses are enormously heavy. At the California facility we absolutely cannot handle large horses. In Alberta, we can handle somewhat larger specimens. However, we are also limited by the donations we get, since all of our specimens are donated by private owners who wish to see the loss of their horse turned to some good, by benefiting our interested students.

In any case, there is no difference at all between pony vs. horse anatomy, so you get exactly the same learning in either case. Plus, smaller specimens are highly desirable for another reason that students appreciate: they have yards and yards less skin that we have to spend time taking off before we can look at the underlying muscles. Less skinning means more time for you to study and appreciate the important stuff!

The California course is more expensive because it is sponsored by Equinology. It is part of a complete course in which people who want to become alternative therapists or equine bodyworkers can enroll. However, Deb Pattillo who runs Equinology very generously (I think) will credit enrolled Equinology students wherever in the world they take this class with me, whether the class is sponsored by Equinology or not, so long as it is the full five days.

So, the main advantage of the California class revolves around the fact that it is held at my own purpose-built laboratory, where we have better facilities for both lecture and lab, plus a scheduled field trip to examine (palpate, learn surface anatomy, learn principles of hoof balance) on live horses whose physical problems I know well. I do my level best wherever I teach to give a great class, so what I'm saying here is that, for all that, there's no place like home.

Looking forward to seeing you and all the other interested students in class this fall. -- Dr. Deb

Leah
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 Posted: Sat Aug 2nd, 2008 07:20 pm
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Dr Deb you are really missing out on the beauty of the east coast. The state of Georgia comes to mind. *grin*

DrDeb
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 Posted: Sat Aug 2nd, 2008 10:26 pm
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Leah, I'm pleased to go wherever I am invited. But I do not advertise, and I do not self-promote -- some clinicians just book a venue in a town and then push advertising so they get a turnout, i.e. like the circus. I don't do that.

So if you want to share the beautiful East Coast with a visitor, and you're interested in going to the (considerable) trouble of organizing and sponsoring, then I'd not only be glad to come, I would be able to come.

Anyone who wishes to sponsor a class can write us at the Institute office and we will then work out the details. Thanks for the invite and for your ongoing interest. -- Dr. Deb

EMail: office@equinestudies.org

Cindi
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 Posted: Sun Aug 3rd, 2008 12:32 am
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I would like to say, as an attendee of the December 2007 course in California, that this course is well worth the time and expense. In fact, I'm saving my pennies in hopes of taking this course again in 2009.

As for dissecting a pony vs. a larger equine, Dr. Deb is spot on when she tells you the less skinning to do, the more  time she has to actually teach. I helped knacker our little horse on the last day and it is considerable work, even on a pony.

I can also say I in no way felt I didn't get enough "bang for my buck" just because we were working with a pony. 

So, if it is at all within anyone's means to take a dissection course with Dr. Deb, I can't recommend it enough. 

Cindi

 

 

Leah
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 Posted: Sun Aug 3rd, 2008 12:52 am
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Thank you for that information. I will email the office for more details.

David Genadek
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 Posted: Thu Aug 14th, 2008 11:12 pm
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I have my ticket for the California class so if any of you are interested anatomy as it pertains to saddle fit I will be running Deb through her paces in that regard. Ideas and concepts will be flying so it will be a fun class!!
David Genadek

minimitts
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 Posted: Fri Aug 29th, 2008 06:09 am
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Hi Dr Deb and Dave,

I'm planning on signing up for the dissection course through Equinology, but just wanted some clarification ~ Dr Deb mentioned that this class was the last week of Nov, though the Equinology site says it's the first week of Dec.  Are there two courses and I'm silly and not aware of one?  I ask because I'd really like to make sure to get to the course that Dave's at too if at all possible, so that I can reap the benefit of being around both your great brains!  cheers, christina

DrDeb
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 Posted: Fri Aug 29th, 2008 08:34 am
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Christina, thanks for this query, because I did make a mistake there and it has caused some confusion. The Equinology flagship class at our lab here in California is December 3-7. Skeleton class follows after a one-day break, to be held Dec. 9-11.

If more folks are interested in enrolling, I am not sure if there is still space in either of these classes, but it won't hurt to contact the Equinology office. EMail them at office@equinology.com and Paul will get right back to you.

We do look forward to seeing everyone here. Weather here in December is usually absolutely gorgeous -- the ideal time to come to California -- temps in the 70's and mostly sunny.

Our new lab is all ready to go this year, too....you'll see when you get here what a cute space it is. We're very proud to tell you that we built it more than 50% from used construction materials. The ceiling beams in the lab are hand-sawn timbers that are more than 100 years old. And the wall paneling is made from chalkboards that they were just going to throw away from one of our local schools. I just couldn't see letting that happen ! -- Dr. Deb

 


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