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Andalusians are they ever gaited?
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Obino
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 Posted: Sun Jan 31st, 2021 05:13 pm
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Hi I was wanting to know if Andalusians, Lusitanos and Carthusians ever have rare gaited individuals?

DrDeb
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 Posted: Sun Jan 31st, 2021 10:25 pm
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Not only are they gaited, Obino, but it isn't even rare. So are Lipizzans, which were bred originally from Andalusian stallions. I have never gotten on a single one of any of these breeds and not felt down in there and known that had I wanted to, I could bring out a nice stepping-pace or andadura from any of them.

Dressage competition is ashamed and embarrassed about this, because after the Napoleonic revision of the world's armies away from the old-fashioned ambler-galloper and toward the trotter-galloper, not one single military officer of any developed country would so much as look at a horse that showed any tendency to amble or pace. This is a mere prejudice but by now it is deeply ingrained; and since Olympic equestrian competition is 100% based on military practice, there is no space for any ambler at the Olympic games. This makes people think that there is something wrong with ambling, and originally, until I broke my own indoctrination and realized that much of the "information" provided by the world's dressage clubs is mere propaganda, I thought so too.

But this is a huge mistake, because study of the so-called "intermediate gaits" offers huge insights into how horses move and how they coordinate their movements, no matter whether they be trotters, pacers, or something (or several things) in-between. I find that Cuban, Peruvian, and some American "gaited horse aficionados" with whom I have talked know FAR more about "purity of gait" than any German-speaker that I have ever met or read.

So, here's the punch line: Installment no. 1 of the Tom Bass biopic that I mentioned in the "stumbling in front" thread is due out in the Spring issue of EQUUS Magazine. Installment no. 2 of the two-part piece will either appear in the same issue or in the next (Summer 2021) issue. Part 2 is an analysis of what "the American High School" is and what it entailed in Tom Bass's day and as we transitioned from that to competitive dressage. There are filmstrips showing rack, and short strips showing what the connection is between trot at one extreme and pace at the other, which of course includes the "intermediate" gaits, such as stepping pace and foxtrot.

Further, in the Summer issue there will also be another installment of our ongoing series concerning the American Standardbred, and this article includes a world map showing the frequency of "gaitedness" in many different breeds worldwide. This article principally concerns why Standardbreds pace/amble at all, because after all they are founded upon the stallion Bellfounder, who was a Norfolk Trotter, and upon Thoroughbred, which today is about as un-gaited a breed as you could find. But once long ago, in the 17th and 18th centuries, the Thoroughbred showed a high percentage of individuals who were ambler-gallopers, and this article presents portraits and commentary on the conformation and pedigree of those most important in the history of the Standardbred (and Quarter Horse and American Saddlebred, the three breeds being closely related in their origins).

So, again -- I hope y'all do subscribe. $18USD or whatever extra it costs to ship overseas seems to me to be incredibly inexpensive considering the amount of information that subscribers get. Cheers -- Dr. Deb

Obino
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 Posted: Mon Feb 1st, 2021 01:33 am
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Thank you so much for the great and detailed answer Dr. Deb. I am an Equus subscriber and you are the prime reason that I am. The series on the breeds we have in America has been great if you put into a book I would buy it.

I love gaited horses especially the spanish breeds. I am really going to be looking forward to the installments on the Standardbred and their gaits and and where it's origins began.

No problem subscribing I live in Pa.

DrDeb
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 Posted: Mon Feb 1st, 2021 02:30 am
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We are working on finding a publisher for such a book. If we do not, then eventually I might offer it as a book on CD, which we can publish here at the Institute ourselves. One way or another, I think this is a very important project because although there are some very good breed historians working today -- I offer a list FYI below, and there are more that have probably slipped my mind for the moment -- most of them are rather narrowly focused on events that occurred within just one breed. I always seek to embed whatever I'm talking about in any given month within a broader context of what was going on at the time in this country and (sometimes) the world. Also, I include cross-breed information, pointing out links both sociological and genealogical between related breeds.

Another important thing I try to do is to give for each breed a kind of nuts-and-bolts overview, so that students learn the major bloodlines, so that names such as Mokhladi, the Clay Arabians, Printer, *Janus, *Fearnaught, *Morton's Traveller, Rysdyk's Hambletonian, Bellfounder, *Glencoe, Sir Archy, and the Old Sorrel become familiar and people begin to realize why they're important.

Lastly, the principles of population biology and zoogeography are highly relevant to outcomes in horse breeding not only in this country but everywhere, and to my knowledge there is no other person who brings this perspective to articles on breed history. This is why I offer regular reminders of the immense importance of the Hobby as a breed, lest anyone get the idea that "genetics" is going to tell you everything. You can't do a DNA analysis on an extinct breed. And then there's the ethnography, which teaches us that amblers were common in antiquity, so that I often include museum artifacts (ancient mosaics, sculptures, bas-reliefs, etc.) which almost always can be taken "literally" as attempts to show the color, conformation, or way of going of the horses depicted.

The current series in EQUUS is almost entirely devoted to the Anglo- and Franco-American breeds; if it ever hits the streets as a book, it will be the companion volume to "Conquerors", which is the history of the Hispano-American breeds. Both must be considered in any work that pretends to cover American history, and so must the European and Asian "prequel" to that story.

So here's a list of excellent and reliable websites or magazine authors for those who are interested in particular breeds:

Thoroughbred Heritage: http://www.tbheritage.com. This site has a huge amount of information on Thoroughbreds and there are many contributing authors.

Arabians: see cmkarabians.com, and look for articles by Mary Jane Parkinson at "The Arabian Horse World"

Sporthorses, but really TB, QH, Standardbred, Saddlebred: Kathleen Kirsan at sport-horse-breeder.com

American Morgan Horse Association archives @scua.library.umass.edu

American Morgan Horse Association photo files on line

Articles  by Brenda Tippin on Morgan Horse history at "The Morgan Horse"

Obino
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 Posted: Mon Feb 1st, 2021 04:24 pm
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I have your book Conquerors and I love the book. Even though I'm reading all the articles in Equus I would definitely purchase the companion book. Another book about horses from the East would be fabulous too.

I've learned a tremendous amount from your articles not just about the horse but history. I also never realized when looking at ancient pictures of horses that often times you can clearly see that they were gaiting but until you pointed that out I didn't realize what I was looking at.

Thank you for the extra links and I will just keep waiting for that magazine to be in my mailbox.


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