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Adrienne
Member
 

Joined: Tue May 8th, 2007
Location: Ohio USA
Posts: 34
Status:  Offline
Posted: Thu May 17th, 2007 10:50 am
Hello everyone,

 I like the new forum!

 Turns out my little Morab mare Gracie is pregnant. I bought her last late summer and had no idea she was bred, I guess it was by one of the yearling colts that was running with her in the pasture where I bought her from. I thought they were gelded but apparently not!

 She is due soon,  this weekend or next week probably.

I am moving from NE Ohio to Allegheny county VA in July, this summer.

 My question is how should I haul a young foal with his/her mother? I was planning on using a stock trailer, would the front half of a 4 horse stock trailer be enough room? I plan on leaving the mare(and of course the foal) loose. How old should the foal be to haul that long of a distance, about an 8 hour long haul?

 I will of course be speaking to my vet about all this but I'd like to hear from anyone who has experience hauling a young foal and what worked or didn't work for you.

Also how often should I stop to let the foal rest? I won't be unloading the mare and foal but rather planned on pulling off in a quiet area in the shade and stopping the truck to let the mare and foal rest, how often would be best?

Thank you for your help!

                  Adrienne
Scott Wehrmann
Member
 

Joined: Sat Mar 24th, 2007
Location: Blair, Nebraska USA
Posts: 16
Status:  Offline
Posted: Sat May 19th, 2007 01:39 pm
Hi!

We've hauled quite a few youngsters like yours longs distances, as you're planning.  Get in and go.  Stop, fuel up.  Get some coffee or a hamburger, get back on the road.  The foal will lie down and rest as you drive,  no problem.  When you stop, the baby might get up and nurse a bit.  Everything will be fine.  Just go, and get there.  The front of a stock trailer is just right.  There really isn't anything to worrry about. 

The thing you DO have to worry about is the other crazy drivers doing all the stooopid things they usually do. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adrienne
Member
 

Joined: Tue May 8th, 2007
Location: Ohio USA
Posts: 34
Status:  Offline
Posted: Sun May 20th, 2007 08:00 pm
Thank you Scott for your help and sound advice.

 Sounds like I shouldn't have any problems then.:-)

 Thank you again,

       Adrienne




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