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Whip-like hoof movement
 Moderated by: DrDeb  
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Pam
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Location: Lafayette, California USA
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 Posted: Thu Sep 13th, 2007 07:07 pm
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Joe,

I had a trainer who referred to my horse as a '63 Ford and wouldn't I rather ride one of her warmbloods, that are more like a Mazzarati (sp?).  I very politely said "No I wouldn't" and kept riding.  Well, I did ride one of her horses later on and he was very crooked and hard to ride.  I couldn't wait to get back on my guy.  He is a beautiful dark bay TB!  I thought to myself that what I was dealing with was a very prejudiced person.


Needless to say I ended that relationship and wouldn't take a lesson from her if she paid me, for she has nothing to teach me.

Pam

Last edited on Thu Sep 13th, 2007 07:11 pm by Pam

DrDeb
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 Posted: Fri Sep 14th, 2007 01:19 am
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Pam -- I am 100% certain that the quotation you attribute to Tom Dorrance should not be attributed to him. "Getting work out of a horse" is not something I ever heard him speak about, and I am certain that the quotation does not come from his book.

As to people speaking mean to you: honey, anytime anybody is doing anything different, they are going to be the target of meanness. This is because it takes brains, creativity, enthusiasm, and courage to do anything different from "what has always been done" in this world, in any area.

So you can carp, or you can deal. Better to deal than carp, in my view, since carping gets you nowhere and is a waste of energy that just feeds the "pain bodies" of the people who harass, laugh and point, bully, or attack.

And Joe, old bean, here's one for you from Ray Hunt: "I never make the same mistake twice, because I'm too busy makin' new ones! So, smile and go at it."

And also: "Man that never made a mistake never done nothin' anyway."

Cheers -- Dr. Deb

 

Pam
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 Posted: Fri Sep 14th, 2007 07:39 pm
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DrDeb wrote: Pam -- I am 100% certain that the quotation you attribute to Tom Dorrance should not be attributed to him. "Getting work out of a horse" is not something I ever heard him speak about, and I am certain that the quotation does not come from his book.

 Pam wrote:

Joe & Julie,

I recall a statement from Tom Dorrance's book "True Unity" where he says something like "It is an honor to the horse to get all you can out of him"  

Here is what Tom Dorrance wrote in "True Unity", and I was recalling:

Page 70:

But a good horseman gets the most he possibly can out of each horse,with the right attitude.  In other words, it's almost a sin, in a way, just to get part.  Given the right circumstances and the right situation, get the most you possibly can. It's an honor to the horse.

 I wasn't thinking in terms of "work".  I was thinking of the whole horse, which I believe includes riding.

Regards,

Pam

DrDeb
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 Posted: Sat Sep 15th, 2007 12:12 am
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Again, Pam, I am quite sure that Tom did not say this. You have to understand that 50% of Tom's book is composed of statements made by students. I am sitting in England as I write this, so you're going to have to help me out here, but go look at the title of the chapter in which those words appear, and tell me what it is....from that, I can tell you if it is a chapter spoken by Tom, or a chapter composed of interpretations, reactions, and views that belong to various students who all contributed anonymously. -- Dr. Deb

iceryder
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 Posted: Fri Sep 28th, 2007 03:33 pm
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"But a good horseman gets the most he possibly can out of each horse, with the right attitude."


Could this mean that the horseman helps the horse reach his full potential?

Judy

Pam
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 Posted: Sat Sep 29th, 2007 12:03 am
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Hi Judy,

I interpret that to mean "willing communication between horse and person", and that is no small thing, I'm finding.   I think when there is willingness is where the right attitude comes in.  But I have much to learn.

Pam

Ben Tyndall
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 Posted: Sat Sep 29th, 2007 03:13 pm
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Page 70 of "True Unity" is part of the chapter "Tom's Students Visit about Tom", and the comment "But a good horseman gets the most he possibly can out of each horse..." is clearly not authored by Mr. Dorrance, but rather by someone else.

...Ben

Pam
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 Posted: Mon Oct 1st, 2007 07:12 pm
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Yep, I figured that out..Ben.  But I still liked the statement even though it was from one of Tom's students.  I assume he has it in his book for a good reason, whatever that may be.  Also, I never said it was a quote by Tom, I said "I recalled  that statement from his book", and was going purely by memory.  I won't make that mistake again.

Pam

 


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