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The wiggles?
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ilam
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 Posted: Sun Jun 12th, 2011 08:25 pm
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Forward: a dimension, a direction. Going forward vs going sideways, backwards, up or down. Horses can go in all kinds of directions when in avoidance to e.g. a rider interfering, lack of confidence, lack of balance, etc, that is why it is so fundamental.


Collection - The highest form of centered balance. Collection comes from core balance, leading to the highest possible athletic ability of the horse or horse/rider unit, enabling them to execute the most difficult athletic maneuvers with ease.


Isabel

DrDeb
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 Posted: Sun Jun 12th, 2011 09:01 pm
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Isabel, very good -- your French is dandy. "Descente de jambe" means RELEASE of pressure or CESSATION of activity of the leg. Likewise, "Descente de main" means that the hand RELEASES to the horse. Upon release, the directions go on to say (which is not part of the definition, though it is useful to know), the horse ought not to make any change until the rider calls for one -- i.e., the rider releases when the horse has done what has been asked, and the horse then "carries itself" as long as it can manage. When it starts to lose its balance -- as it inevitably will -- the rider should step in again with an active hand and/or leg.

This principle is re-stated by Ray Hunt as: "always reward the smallest change and the slightest try." Notice that "release" is HOW we give "reward".

These are also exactly the directions for how we are to live to a standard, something that comes up in my clinic lessons all the time. Many riders do not seem to understand that they must live to a standard and that it is their job to make that standard clear to the horse. The rider must pay attention all the time. Thus, when we say that the minimum acceptable walk for an average-sized horse is 5 1/2 mph (7 kph), that means that so long as the horse is walking with that much vigor or more, then the hands and the legs are to be quiet -- be still. But the moment the horse seems teetering on the brink of falling below this standard, then the leg becomes active in that moment. As soon as the horse raises its energy output to the minimum standard or more, then again the leg becomes quiet.

And so for all things: the hand comes in to help when the horse loses balance or requires direction. The leg comes in to help when the energy quantum starts to flag, or to help the horse balance, or to ask for a change in the direction of flight of one or more of the horse's legs -- and so on. But as soon as the horse carries itself straight and in balance, putting forth the quantum of energy that has been asked for, then the rider "just goes along for the ride," as Ray used to say. -- Dr. Deb

Ride A Grey Horse
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 Posted: Sun Jun 12th, 2011 09:28 pm
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I'll try "forward" - it's happily on my mind, as my horse has only recently become willing to go without reluctance. This feels amazing; thank you, Dr.Deb, we've been following your Rx for one-step-at-a-time.


Forward: The horse's cooperative willingness to go. And stop.



From what I've been experiencing this last month or so, it feels like my horse had to soften, before he could be forward ... ? I had to first give him a reason to soften.
There are other terms on the list, too (at least the ones I think I understand) that seem like the horse can't fully have one without the others.

Cynthia

ilam
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 Posted: Mon Jun 13th, 2011 02:29 pm
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Ramener: The literal translation is "to bring back", such as bringing back a gift for someone. The 'r' indicates the meaning of 'back' to the word, when I looked up "amener" I found that the meaning of that word is far more complex. It can mean 'to add to', 'to lead to', 'contribute', 'to bring about', 'to cause'.

As per the definition on that French site, ramener is used as a noun and it seems to describe a state of what we know in English as the very inaccurate expression of the horse 'being on the bit'. The word describes (according to this web site) the head, neck and poll position the horse assumes when it is collected:

Ramener (le) : Se caractérise par la fermeture de l'angle de la tête avec l'encolure, la nuque étant le point le plus haut. Le véritable ramener est la résultante d'un engagement des postérieurs du cheval sous la masse, de l'impulsion et du rassembler dans l'équilibre.

"Ramener: is characterized by the formation of the angle of the head with the neck, the poll being the highest point. True 'ramener' is the result of the engagement of the hind quarters underneath its body, impulsion and collection in equilibrium."

Isabel

Jeannie
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 Posted: Mon Jun 13th, 2011 06:26 pm
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I will add this:

 Collection: the equal distribution of weight between the hindquarters and the forehand. A consequence of teaching the horse how to move straight and balanced while carrying the weight of a rider.

 Ramener: lightness in hand, which is the result of the horse's ability to raise the base of the neck without bracing. A consequence of collection.

 Cadence: the lifting and setting down action of the feet. A consequence of, and in direct proportion to, the ability of the horse to collect.
      
                                           Jeannie

Sam
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 Posted: Tue Jun 14th, 2011 12:55 am
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What fun.
Collection: The Gift of Straightness.
Ramener: Turn loose. (this is a real stab in the dark, if I think about this word, my mind goes Eh?...but my insides want to type Turn loose?!)
Impulsion: The side effect of Collection.
Softness: I really like Sammy's definition on that one, Ditto.

Judy

Blue Flame
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 Posted: Tue Jun 14th, 2011 08:27 am
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If I may draw on martial arts and gymnastic experience . . . .






 Collection:

A preparatory or ready posture and attitude, which at essence collects the energies of the animal into a state of readiness for movement in any direction. The animal is prepared to move, but has not yet committed fully to the movement (both mentally and physically), thus energy is held in reserve in preparation for a change in the flow of energy.




 . . . Bruce Lee wrote, while lying on his back in hospital, of a combat ready posture which he called the "semi-phasic-bent-stance". It is the preparatory position which most balances the the ability of the body to move in any particular direction - such that the angle described by the joints, the curvature of the spine and the tone of the muscles is prepared for, but not yet committed to, movement in whatever direction may be necessary. It is the posture which must be adopted before springing into action, hence to have already adopted the posture is to be already prepared to spring. I believe this is a human equivalent of collection in the horse - which could be thought of a half coiled or tensioned spring, neither fully extended nor fully compressed thus equally able to absorb or expend energy as may be required.


Sandy

Last edited on Tue Jun 14th, 2011 08:30 am by Blue Flame

ruth
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 Posted: Tue Jun 14th, 2011 09:37 am
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Sandy, could that be summed up in one word, balance?

Schwung - the German, swing, is manifest with a tail swinging softly like a tassle, no switching tail! If swing is the result of a perfectly aligned spine, it is also a mental state, like a child skipping, only a happy child skips along. Creating our own definitions is a very difficult exercise as it emphasises how interrelated they all are, and also how subjective and therefore how inappropriate for competition but appropriate for an art form - their original condition.
Ruth

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 Posted: Tue Jun 14th, 2011 10:14 am
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Ruth,

I think balance is a necessary part of it. However, balance does not imply stored (collected) energy, muscle tone or mental anticipation - thus while part of collection, does not fully describe it. i.e. one could be balanced but not 'ready'.

Sandy 

Ola
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 Posted: Tue Jun 14th, 2011 12:54 pm
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Tempo – the number of hoof-strikedowns per minute (or any other, particular period of time)
Rhythm – the evenness (the same space of time) between every hoofbeat.
A horse can move forward at various rhythms but all while maintaining the same tempo.
I think it’s quite opposite – when you have “slower” rhythm, which means the space of time between hoof-strikedowns is shortened, the horse moves at a slower tempo, and the overall speed depends upon many different things like the length of step, cadence etc.
 
Softness – the mental state, when the horse has given his every little particle of soul to his trainer, which is visibly seen on the outside; relaxed posture without any brace and the ability to flex its body with ease.
 
And an additional question: what is the difference between step and stride? I am totally muddled on this subject.

CavalryHorse
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 Posted: Tue Jun 14th, 2011 02:56 pm
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If the space and time between hoof strikes was shortened, than you would have a faster rhythm.
A collected canter (quicker rhythm) and an extended canter (slower rhythm) both reflect different rhythms, but can both be executed within the same tempo.

It is the same in music. The piece might be written to be played at Allegro with a time signature of 4/4, but the rhythm could vary in each measure from 4 whole notes, or 2 half notes, or 8 quarter notes, or a combination of all.

Tempo is the forest, rhythm is the trees. :)

Last edited on Tue Jun 14th, 2011 02:57 pm by CavalryHorse

ilam
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 Posted: Tue Jun 14th, 2011 02:59 pm
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Step = the action of moving one foot from one location to another location.

Stride = the amount of distance between steps

Isabel

Ola
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 Posted: Tue Jun 14th, 2011 04:25 pm
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CavalryHorse wrote: If the space and time between hoof strikes was shortened, than you would have a faster rhythm.
Oh yes, it's a faster rhythm indeed ;) sorry for the mistake and thank you for correction. And thank you Isabel as well.

Jeannie
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 Posted: Tue Jun 14th, 2011 05:26 pm
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  Durchlassigkeit:  The feet are in your hands.

Adrienne
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 Posted: Wed Jun 15th, 2011 07:40 pm
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Forward: Moves freely forward in straightness and balance without brace, hesitancy or a "brakes still partly on" feeling.

Softness:Freely yields or gives when asked, easily shaped, malleable.
Free of brace or tension in the body, mind and emotions.

 Adrienne


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