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Awkward Stumble
 Moderated by: DrDeb  
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kimc911
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Joined: Sun Nov 2nd, 2008
Location: Coldspring, Texas USA
Posts: 24
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Mon Jan 2nd, 2012 03:03 am
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Thank you for your reply Dr. Deb and Happy New Year,

Currently I am catching up on reading here in the forum and looking up everything I can on this site for locking stiffles.  This is very new to me as never in all the years I have been owned by horses has this issue ever surfaced in a horse so young, my experience is severly lacking in this area and I endeavor to educate myself.  For an older horse with an injury that PT will work on is something I can deal with.  I have no experience with a young growing horse with this problem and no background to even know if it is genetic pre-disposition and may the reason the people threw her over the fence.

So far I have found nothing on nutrition or if just her starvation may have an effect on the stifles of growing horses.  May just also have missed it, am getting blury eyes from all the reading.  She is being lightly exercised on hill work (not steep, more like shallow ditches, that can be driven through), plus has free turnout on (I believe 5 acres now with two one horses).

The new owners are wonderful and the Vet works with us both, she is loose in the stiffle (vets term) and does not show any locking while walking or backing at the walk and  only a few times when running free and then coming to a fast halt.

Will continue my studies tomorrow.

Thank you for keeping this site up and running,

Kim

DrDeb
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Joined: Fri Mar 30th, 2007
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 Posted: Mon Jan 2nd, 2012 07:16 am
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Kim, "loose stifles" is a synonym or term that means the same thing as "chronically locking stifles".

Yes of course nutrition has an effect on growth. However, malnutrition does not directly cause locking stifles.

It is highly unlikely that anyone threw the filly over a fence. Much more probable that she crashed into it herself while goofing off, and flipped over for a crash landing. Please be much slower to conclude that people have been intentionally abusing a horse -- it is highly unlikely. Do not use the idea that "those other people abused this horse" as a lever for your own ego-satisfaction (i.e., "I am much more knowledgeable and much kinder than they are"). Just don't get into comparisons of that kind; instead, focus on the actual needs of the animal.

PT for locking stifles will be exactly the same for a young horse as for an older one.

Find threads dealing with this topic in this Forum by first going outside to Google. Enter keywords "advanced search" and it will pull up Google's own advanced search page. Enter our Forum address, http://esiforum.mywowbb.com in the bar at the bottom of the page where it says to specify or limit the search, and then enter keyword "stifle", "locking stifle", "patella", "stifle joint" into the keyword search bar. By using our forum address you limit the search to just this forum.

Happy New Year, and let us know what you find out. -- Dr. Deb


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