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BIRDCATCHER SPOTS
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Cathy Cowgirl
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 Posted: Wed Oct 20th, 2010 12:32 pm
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My 14 yr. old sorrel quarter horse stallion has recently gotten small spots all over his body, from muzzle to tail.  From the research I've done, it appears that he has "Birdcatcher" spots.  Can you tell me anything about these spots?  I'd like to know the reason for their appearance as wll as any other pertinent information you might give.  Thank you.

cyndy
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 Posted: Sat Oct 23rd, 2010 02:06 pm
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I would like to hear more on this too. I have a mare who has that, and she gets more spots with age. Her mane and tail have at least 60% white hair too, which has increased with age. All three of her colts have done the same thing as they got older. Some are white spots and some are a "roan" smear spot.

Dorothy
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 Posted: Sat Oct 23rd, 2010 03:59 pm
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Hello!

What are 'birdcatcher spots'? I have never heard of them. Can you describe them please?

Dorothy

ShotenStar
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 Posted: Sun Oct 24th, 2010 12:57 pm
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Wikipedia is your friend:
Natural markings
Birdcatcher spots are small white spots, usually between 1 mm and 1 inch (25.4 mm) in diameter. It is not yet known what controls their expression, although it is believed that they are not genetic. Birdcatcher spots occur in many breeds. These spots may occur late in a horse's life, or may occur and then disappear.

Ticking or Birdcatcher ticks are markings that involves white flecks of hair at the flank, and white hairs at the base of the tail, called a "skunk tail". These patterns are permanent and probably genetic. It is thought that this roaning effect might be linked to the rabicano gene. The name comes from a Thoroughbred horse named Birdcatcher, who had white hairs throughout his flank and tail


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Dorothy
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 Posted: Sun Oct 24th, 2010 06:13 pm
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Thank you, that is helpful!

I believe, then, that this is what Zara Philip's event horse, Toytown, had - gradually increasing numbers of small white spots all over his body as he aged.

Dorothy

flag62003
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 Posted: Thu Oct 28th, 2010 12:49 am
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We've had three sorrels that developed birdcatcher spots. I read that feeding sea kelp to them would diminish the spots over time and it did work. I don't know if it's iodine or what that makes the difference. The first mare, I got the sea kelp at a health food store. Later, someone told me Source would do the same thing and I used that on two others.


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