ESI Q and A Forums Home
 Search       Members   Calendar   Help   Home 
Search by username
Not logged in - Login | Register 

strangles
 Moderated by: DrDeb  
 New Topic   Reply   Print 
AuthorPost
Rosita
Member
 

Joined: Fri Apr 20th, 2007
Location:  
Posts: 2
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Mon May 28th, 2007 04:28 pm
 Quote  Reply 
My horses are older - 13 and 15 years old.  I do not know all their history but I have vaccinated for strangles last year.  I really do not want to do this again.  I feel their natural immunity should be enough - they are both very healthy horses but they are in contact with a lot of other horses.  Any opinions?

 

 

Scott Wehrmann
Member
 

Joined: Sat Mar 24th, 2007
Location: Blair, Nebraska USA
Posts: 16
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Mon May 28th, 2007 05:54 pm
 Quote  Reply 
Hi!

If you've ever seen a horse go through the whole struggle with strangles, you'll want to vaccinate.  It is ugly.  And there just isn't anything you can do about it once it starts.  I don't worry much about vaccines for my horses here....just the basics for the youngsters...and then back off and let their natural immunity handle things.  But they don't have any contact with outside horses at all.  Now, once they are started and going well and they are getting ready for a new home, that is another deal.  I vaccinate them for everything I can.  I'd like to think that between a bone-deep inherent strength and the vaccines they will weather just about any storm.   

The nasal vaccine can be a really tough experience for a lot of people and horses.  About the best approach I've seen is to get your horse VERY good about his mouth and muzzle and nostrils.  Be able to kind of massage the inside of the nostril with your thumb.  Then when you decide to vaccinate, tape the tube on the side of your thumb and proceed as usual.  Get it over with before he knows anything is coming.  It doesn't have to be a big deal. 

  

 

DrDeb
Super Moderator
 

Joined: Fri Mar 30th, 2007
Location:  
Posts: 3232
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Mon May 28th, 2007 06:25 pm
 Quote  Reply 
Rosita -- if your horse is in contact with a lot of other horses, I think you have no alternative but to vaccinate against strangles. This for two reasons: (1) You want to protect your own horse, and (2) You have an ethical responsibility to the horse-owning community of which you are part: if your horse is vaccinated, he will not be contributing to a strangles outbreak.

Strangles is a highly contagious disease. If there is an outbreak at your barn or stable, the local authorities (veterinarian and health inspector) will quarantine the place. This means no horses will be able to go in or out. Rather than have this happen, I am sure that you would want to be able to present the document stating that your horse has been vaccinated.

There is a current fad against vaccinations. Rosita, it's an internet rumor, it's fringe, and it's highly foolish, because your horses' immune systems are NOT enough -- no matter how healthy they seem, they can catch strangles very easily. So follow your veterinarian's advice to vaccinate.

If you want to save a few bucks and do your bit toward having a more wholesome life, skip the movie, throw away the cell phone, and grow your own tomatoes.

Best wishes -- Dr. Deb

Joe
Member
 

Joined: Mon Apr 16th, 2007
Location: Texas
Posts: 282
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Mon May 28th, 2007 07:41 pm
 Quote  Reply 
Dr. Deb is spot on as usual.

For what it is worth, I have a 24 year old who gets the full load of vaccinations with no ill effects at all.  Once, he got a double load -- two full sets of vaccinations within two weeks -- because we had not marked the records clearly and two different vets visited the barn.  Obviously, we were worried, but no ill effects were observed.  He continued to go about his life happily, with bright eyes and a shining coat, converting money into manure all day long.

Joe Sullivan

renoo
Member


Joined: Wed Mar 28th, 2007
Location: Latvia
Posts: 72
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Thu May 31st, 2007 03:05 pm
 Quote  Reply 
the thing I wonder: can the ill effects of vaccines [have heard a lot about them] be because the vaccines were not properly stored or used on time or something like that?

If so, it is important to follow who provides you with vaccines and check the "best before" date also, right? In case you want to be sure the vaccines can really do no harm...

I personally don't believe that vaccines can cause bad effects if they are used properly and in correct dosage, and have not been spoiled...

Maybe, if you live somewhere isolated you can skip some vaccinations. Also - I guess there is no need to vaccinate for ilnesses that just don't exist in your region [for example there is no Western Nile fever [forgot the precise name, sorry] ever detected anywhere close to where I live [Europe, Latvia]...]

Last edited on Thu May 31st, 2007 03:06 pm by renoo

Joe
Member
 

Joined: Mon Apr 16th, 2007
Location: Texas
Posts: 282
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Sat Jun 2nd, 2007 04:39 am
 Quote  Reply 
I woud imagine that spoiled vaccine could be a problem, but woud expect it is more likely that it just loses its potency. However, I don't really know.  Still, this whole vaccination brouhaha seems to be one of those "issues" that seems to sweep the horse world like a bad rumor through a college dorm.  The internet makes it faster.  Without modern veterenary medicine, a good many of our animals would be dead or incapacitated.  People forget that and seem to assume that a disease-free state is somehow normal, while vaccinations are not. 

They, of course, get it backwards.  Most of our animals live relatively disease free because of vaccinations and other prophylactic medicine, just as most of us do.  Consider human life in the third world.  I have seen people who had to waddle near the ground like ducks because due to polo they were literally unable to straighten their legs and stand.  TB, leprosy, and many other diseases that we and our doctors know most from history books are real threats.  The difference in quality and length of life there and life in the developed world is largely due to immunizations.  Similarly, without equine immunizations, we would relegate our animals to the equivalent of third-world poverty.

Cheers!

Joe

Rosita
Member
 

Joined: Fri Apr 20th, 2007
Location:  
Posts: 2
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Tue Jun 5th, 2007 12:34 am
 Quote  Reply 
I followed everyone's adivice about the strangles inter-nasal vaccine.  I did my two horses last night and tonite one of them has a snotty nose and she was absolutely fine yesterday.  I do not believe in coincidences - is this a reaction to the vaccine and if so what do I do now?  Is it possible that she may have already had a lot of natural immunity to the disease and this was just too much?

Appreciate any info you can give me.

Joe
Member
 

Joined: Mon Apr 16th, 2007
Location: Texas
Posts: 282
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Tue Jun 5th, 2007 01:22 am
 Quote  Reply 
Rosita:

If the symptoms persist, ask your vet.  Perhaps there was some nasal irritiation or some other mild side effect.  On the other hand, conicidences occur all the time.  Perhaps the symptoms are completely unrelated.

If your animal had natural immunity (exceedingly unlikely), the innoculation would just boost that, or at worst be a waste of effort.

Joe 

DrDeb
Super Moderator
 

Joined: Fri Mar 30th, 2007
Location:  
Posts: 3232
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Tue Jun 5th, 2007 04:48 am
 Quote  Reply 
Rosita -- has it been difficult for you, for any reason, to talk with your veterinarian? I think you need to find a veterinarian that you feel good about talking with and whose advice you can understand and trust. This needs to be your PRIMARY relationship -- the FIRST place you go to for advice with your horse, rather than trying to "do it yourself" by gleaning advice off the Internet.

As we have stated in this space before, we make no pretense of diagnosing any condition or illness. All that can be, and all that is, given here is the type of discussion that one horse owner might have with another. There are no veterinarians (to my knowledge) posting on this board, and none has posted in this thread. The only person who can diagnose your horse is your local veterinarian, and that's not only because he or she is qualified to do this by their training, but also because they're the only ones who can directly observe and examine your horse.

Rosita, you seem to have some misconceptions about how vaccines work. With this, I can help you. What vaccines do is stimulate your horse's immune system to mount a defence against a perceived "invasion". The "invasion" is, of course, from the vaccine itself. Vaccines create this reaction in various ways -- some of them contain ground-up fragments of the actual bacterium that causes the illness -- these are "killed" vaccines. Others consist of some other substance, sometimes created in the body of a "host" such as a rabbit or a cow or another horse, sometimes created in a petri dish in a lab, which will likewise stimulate the immune system.

Your veterinarian should have responded to any concerns that you expressed about the need for vaccinations or the way they work, by telling you that anytime a vaccine is given there is a chance of the animal actually developing the disease against which it is being immunized. The chance of this happening with "killed"-type vaccines is higher, although overall still very low.

So, if you are now seeing symptoms in your horse, you need to call your vet and talk to him or her. Before causing you the additional expense of having them make another call to your stable, the vet will probably ask you to do two things:

(1) Take the horse's temperature (rectal thermometer suitable for use with horses should be part of your health kit that is kept at the barn), and

(2) Describe the nature of the nasal discharge (PUS is different from SNOT).

If this is your first horse, Rosita, or if you've owned a horse less than five years, you're still in a position to be learning quite a few things. You should regard this as a marvellous opportunity rather than as something to be ashamed of or defensive about -- the novice is in no position to be an expert, so there's no reason to burden yourself with any feeling that you need to be that. It's been my observation that many "new" horse owners are hard on the stable personnel and on their veterinarians -- hard, because the novice naturally does not have a lot of perspective or experience, and this can cause them to be uptight, critical, or scared that something bad is going to happen when really, it isn't a problem.

But again, the only ones who can determine this are you and your vet, working together as a team. Let the veterinarian teach you, and then tap us a note back here to let us know how it all came out.

Best wishes -- Dr. Deb


 Current time is 03:23 pm




Powered by WowBB 1.7 - Copyright © 2003-2006 Aycan Gulez