ESI Q and A Forums Home

 Moderated by: DrDeb  
AuthorPost
DrDeb
Super Moderator
 

Joined: Fri Mar 30th, 2007
Location:  
Posts: 3295
Status:  Offline
Dear People -- I excerpt the following quotations posted by Caparella and Meg in the "What would you like for Christmas" thread, because I don't really understand what these two people actually want. Please read the excerpts and my questions, and then whoever wants to contribute, can do so:

From Caparella -- I agree and border on pleading for a DVD release of a clinic. I too have watched Buck's 7 clinics over and over. My teacher advised me to read and watch everything from your material, Buck, Tom's…regarding the videos, to watch them with no sound, with sound, watching the horse, watching the instructor, shining the flashlight of my attention on every detail piece by piece. Hopefully I will absorb it all in time. It is helpful to watch over and over, as something new pops out each time my consciousness is able to contain it. Also one can pause video to freeze frame or slowly peruse (in slow motion) detail that may have been missed.
All of your teaching materials are exceptional, and a DVD of a clinic of yours would be first on my wish list.


From Meg -- Another late comer as a result of thinking about this off and on since your initial post on the subject. I would love to see you use Vimeo, as does Caroline Two Ponies, to share everything from interesting snippets from clinics -- both riding and anatomy -- to specific movements and how to accomplish them, to recognizing and addressing "bye bye Birdie" moments and anything else from the book or the Mannering CD, to building and learning to use the drum. And that is just a few ideas. I like Vimeo because the videos are easy to access and may be purchased or rented.

Questions from Dr. Deb:

(1) If you have watched Buck's clinic videos many times, how is it that you have NOT absorbed -- whatever it is that you had wanted to absorb? I mean specifically -- how is it that you are measuring your failure to absorb?

(2) What, specifically, were you hoping that watching a video of myself working with students and horses, would teach you that Buck's videos did not?

(3) Why is DVD/video important to you? In other words -- both Caparella and Meg were very complimentary about the instructional materials that are already available from me -- those materials being in written and audio format where it comes to horse training as opposed to anatomy studies. What does DVD/video provide for you that other media do not?

(4) What more is it that you want, or think you need that I can provide for you? I want to know your "wish list" of stuff you think you haven't accomplished, in other words what is it that you wish you and your horse could do right now, that you cannot do right now? Be quite specific if you can with your list, please.

My thanks ahead of time to anybody who contributes to this by replying thoughtfully. I am a teacher AS OPPOSED TO a "guru". The "guru" wants your adulation; he or she wants a "fan club". The true teacher has no needs that she wants or needs to have students fulfill. The true teacher wants students to become fully independent, fully competent, and fully individuated. Your replies will therefore be helping me to help you achieve these over-arching goals. -- Dr. Deb

JaneW
Guest
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status:  Offline
1. It's probably been twenty five years since I watched my video of Buck's. I would watch the video, go practice what I thought I saw, then watch some more. I learned about technique and cause and effect but I didn't learn why. In fact, I didn't even wonder why. The next year I audited one's of Buck's three day clinic's and the next year I rode. Although my horses were responding, they were as Buck put it "doing everything with the parking break on." It took a few more years, two weeks with my horses at Harry's and a couple of week longs with Ray to even scratch the surface. For me, at least, although the videos helped get me started, I needed some hands on stuff to get to the core of what I was seeing.

2. I hope that a video gives me a different perspective (you seem to come at things from a anatomical, scientific slant). I also use them to evaluate clinicians I would like to see, if it would be better to watch or bring a horse, and what to expect.

3. A DVD would actually show in motion what you are talking about. I read the twirling stuff over and over for about 6 months. I tried it, to no avail... then Harry showed me. I was so far off the mark it was comical. Personally, I also like the convenience of popping a DVD in my player.

4. Personally, I would like some re-training exercises. I have a horse that I started at about the same time as I started this journey and he has some BIG holes where I misunderstood what I was seeing. For example, I can send him anywhere, but I can't always lead him. He'll get up on a drum (or in a horse trailer) if I send him, but I can't lead him.

Mare`s Tales
Guest
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status:  Offline
Persnonally, I got a lot out of the USEF/George Morris clinic that Dr. Deb gave and was posted on line.

Over the years I have become fairly well aquainted with this philosophy of horsemanship. I found the above online clinic VERY inspiring and educational. A person just cannot hear the phrases and concepts too many times. Just like Tom Dorrance`s book, no matter how many times I have read it before, something new is going to jump out at me each time I pick it up. I just can not read it too many times.

Not many teachers take the "deep work" to the depth that Dr. Deb takes it. When I read Dr. Deb`s postings on this forum or witness one of her clinics I feel encouraged, knowing that there is a place way past "methods or techniques", past the intellectual and physical and into the heart of this philosophy. I think of the way that Tom used his lovely stories and metaphors to make us all "think" and make learning personal. For me, Tom was bringing life lessons into the light via horsemansip and I think Dr. Deb`s style of teaching does also.

On this point alone, without mentioning all the extra valuable educational teachings about how horses work physically, I think it would be great to have more of Dr. Deb`s clinics awailable to play over and over again, to use the same way as when I feel the need to re-read True Unity.



Having one of her anatomy classes on DVD to view and re-view would be great also.

snowdenfarm
Member
 

Joined: Tue Mar 18th, 2008
Location: Pennsylvania USA
Posts: 28
Status:  Offline
1. I find it difficult to absorb information from a video if: a) there are multiple points to focus on at one time -- so I would like to see the clip played repeatedly with each individual point drawn to my attention; b) the information is demonstrated on a horse with a very different personality/reaction than mine -- so I would like to see many clips of the same material but with different horses; c) the information is not broken down into small, bite-size pieces -- so I would like to see the material broken down like the Mannering CD or the George Morris lectures. There there are things that you can do with your own body while watching the video to reinforce what you are learning and then one or two small steps you can take with you to the barn and come back to the video with more or different questions as a result of your experience.

2. I am looking for the "why's" and specifically what we are looking for in the horse as a response, because these transfer to different situations and different horse personalities more than a step-by-step how-to. When I watch clinics I often just see the horse's body move in the general shape which I then try to achieve and I release when the shape is achieved. What I miss is how the horse should feel in my hand and under my seat and most importantly inside himself, before I release.

3. Video is of great help to us visual learners and is retained better (by me anyway) in my memory when I go out to the barn. I am better able to replay video snippets in my head than audio. I also find still photos deceiving. A horse may only look like one of the pictures for a split second and I may miss it thinking the still picture indicated a longer duration. Vimeo is fine, Youtube may be more familiar to most.

4. For me personally, I am looking for two things: a) my horses to have their birdie with me and feel okay inside whenever they are with me; b) to ride in a way that does not harm the horse physically and allows true collection. I see these as the root of everything from our own safety to trainability to general usefulness to the basis of humane treatment of the animal. I feel like everything else is just the cherry on top. I feel there is no one out there that is getting this message out to the general riding population. If we have the horse's focus and ride with, I think you call it "perjustice", we can use any book, DVD or instructor to learn how to teach our horse various skills because we will know what to use and what to filter out.

Just my two cents...

JulietMacie
Member


Joined: Tue Jun 25th, 2013
Location: Ashfield, Massachusetts USA
Posts: 96
Status:  Offline
Snowdenfarm, your #4 is exactly how I feel and what I want! So well put! thanks.

As for the video question, it isn't my preferred medium for learning -- it all just goes by too quickly for me. There's too much info to process in real time, even with starting and stopping the video. For me, I'll take good, ol' fashioned printed words and pictures. That, plus face-to-face with the instructor.

my 2¢--Juliet

Obie
Member
 

Joined: Fri Sep 28th, 2007
Location: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posts: 57
Status:  Offline
I agree with Juliet, about a good ole' book and pictures. There's nothing better to me than to sit down with my favorite horsemanship book in a quiet part of the house and just ponder what is being said and to study the pictures and just let my mind absorb the content. And even as enjoyable is to take this reading and theory and apply it to my horse as needed.

Linda

Capparella
Member
 

Joined: Mon Nov 24th, 2014
Location: North Carolina USA
Posts: 41
Status:  Offline
I am not sure I can offer a better response for requesting clinic videos than I have read from the previous replies-particularly from Snowdenfarm, so I will respond instead to the query of how one could watch a (Buck) clinic video over and over and not fully absorb what he is teaching.

As a teacher myself (of music), I have noticed that we all learn in different ways and at different rates. Information has to be absorbed over time. Insights occur with experience. Muscle memory occurs with practice. I can work over and over the same piece with a student, and at some point there comes the "ah ha" moment when they get a glimpse, or feel, of the piece. Oft times this understanding recedes into non clarity or confusion, and then returns with even greater clarity over time. Perhaps this is a poor comparison, but it is the only analogous experience I am privy to.

It is likely I am in a different situation than many of the members, as I only "started back" with horses a few years ago, at the ripe age of 48. With my lack of experience, I am in great appreciation of teachers with experience and wisdom. In the beginning I studied some works of some rather "showman" types who imparted information that did not "feel right" to me. In my ignorance I did not understand why.

Luckily I found an excellent teacher that suggested your information, as well as other clinicians in a like minded grouping. I have noticed that as I gain more experience, I can view the same material again, and have new and more thorough insights.

While nothing can substitute for experience, studying a video which engages the visual and auditory senses, seeing the motion/posture/countenance of the clinician and/or student as well as the horse is very helpful and inspiring to me.

I apologize for not being specific, as you requested. I could certainly list numerous skills I wish to improve upon, however at my beginner's level I am considering myself lucky to receive information from those more experienced and knowledgable, and that appear to me to have achieved a degree of communication with horses that I desire.

Redmare
Member
 

Joined: Wed Mar 26th, 2014
Location:  
Posts: 85
Status:  Offline
1. I bought Buck's 7 Clinics DVD set a while back, and I find I constantly return to it. I understand the ideas, the teachings. What I want to see, which the DVD's don't offer much of because they offer snippets: I really want to see Buck, or a clinician, take a horse that they haven't already trained and talk the spectators/participants through what they are doing, encountering with that horse, etc. It's helpful to see the already trained horse, but none of us are dealing with already trained horses, otherwise we wouldn't be watching the DVDs!

2. I don't know if this is just me, but I'm the type of learner who prefers to have one path, one teacher, one set of "vocab" and "tools", if you will, to learn with, at least initially. Once I'm successful with those concepts, it is much easier for me to take other ideas that are essentially the same, from other teachers, and see how they fit in to my horsemanship path. So, as a follower of your work, I totally understand what Meg was saying: I know some of the teachings by the specific language you use, which is unique to you, and it would be helpful to see actual footage of those teachings in action, using the language I am familiar with.

3. I'm a visual learner. I like step by step, but I need to see it. I find myself soaking up teachings in written or audio form, but then having trouble recognizing it in real time when I'm working with a horse. Hence why DVD's/visual tools (like all the pictures in the Birdie Book!) are so helpful.

4. Right now, I am still working on the fundamental of getting my mare OK, or at least more OK, day by day. It is a slow process, largely due to my semi-ineptitude. I think snowdenfarm put it beautifully. What I am wanting most is to better visually understand the changes a troubled horse undergoes when they get to being more OK, and how the handler encourages those changes. At that point, I could go ahead and teach the animal anything, because the foundation has been set. But achieving that foundation, I have found, takes significantly more dedication, patience, perseverance and trial than I ever anticipated.

-1'
Guest
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status:  Offline
1

Attachment: (Downloaded times)

DrDave
Member
 

Joined: Thu Jun 24th, 2010
Location:  
Posts: 13
Status:  Offline
I would prefer not to see more DVDs added to the horsemanship landscape.

All they are good for, for me, is providing an image, a concept, an approach, that I can take and run with. Better yet, that I can forget about and go and be with my horse, a different human for having been exposed to new information.

Someone once said "when music is written down, it dies." I think the same thing happens to the phenomenon of horsemanship when it's captured on video. It's great in and of itself, but like most tools, it all too easily becomes the razor in the monkey's hand.

Now, if one were able to re-create what was seen, as I, a pianist, do with every musical score I encounter, one would have truly integrated and digested the principles behind the techniques, in effect re-composing the piece as if it were one's own creation. This, I believe, is the only useful application of a horsemanship DVD. Mostly because every single time I have tried what they showed (as pure technique), my horses have reminded me how fruitless and dishonest such a pursuit is.

And so, I suggest that no effort be made to produce any new iteration of what is already amply available here. More compelling, perhaps, would be a student's guide to the information, a description of the journey from "human doing" to "human being."

DarlingLil
Member
 

Joined: Wed Jan 25th, 2012
Location: Michigan USA
Posts: 64
Status:  Offline
I benefit from reviewing repeatedly. Even the same information is said a little differently by the same teacher repeating a lesson. Stuff takes a while to sink in sometimes. Especially with the small important details. This stuff is simple but not easy at first. If I keep at it, the light does come on.

JaneW
Guest
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status:  Offline
DrDave wrote "a description of the journey from 'human doing' to 'human being'"

For me, that was the "Birdie Book".

DrDave
Member
 

Joined: Thu Jun 24th, 2010
Location:  
Posts: 13
Status:  Offline
You're absolutely right; you know, Dr. Deb, I guess you don't need to do anything but point. The seeking student will find what he needs.

Got my nose deep in it (The Birdie Book)on this rainy day.

Mare`s Tales
Guest
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status:  Offline
I know the Lord but I still go to Church to hear the Sermons.

DrDeb
Super Moderator
 

Joined: Fri Mar 30th, 2007
Location:  
Posts: 3295
Status:  Offline
Yes; that's what the sermons are for: to point the way. That's what the BB does, too, so DrDave is making right use of that resource. Others seem to need other things, though, and so I continue to just sort of "listen" to this thread before I make a more extensive reply. -- Dr. Deb

Aloha
Member
 

Joined: Fri Feb 3rd, 2012
Location:  
Posts: 50
Status:  Offline
snowdenfarm wrote:
3. Video is of great help to us visual learners
I think that is an important point.


Not sure that everything isn't already out there though. My old trainer always said, when pressed to write a book on training, that the cookbook for YOUR horse needs to be written by YOU. In other words, you can't use a step by step recipe as everyone and every horse is different. Once you have and understand the ingredients however, then you can create many things. That's when the beauty of it comes to life.

The cost of producing such videos must be enormous.

Last edited on Thu Feb 12th, 2015 06:30 am by Aloha

Susanna
Member
 

Joined: Wed Oct 29th, 2014
Location:  
Posts: 1
Status:  Offline
Hello! Spring greetings from North! This is my first post here, I've enjoyed reading the forum very much. Thank you all, especially Dr Deb!

This might be a bit of a dilettante's answer, but I buy lots and lots of DVDs by master riders because I enjoy watching them ride and work with horses. I have more riding DVDs than I have musical Cd's.I'm interested not only in the finished horse, but how they build the work from scratch. I know I can't copy them (have tried that and failed), but I try to keep the images in my mind when I ride. I would love to be able to emulate the feel they have.

CorynKiefer
Member
 

Joined: Sun Apr 5th, 2015
Location: British Columbia Canada
Posts: 3
Status:  Offline
I too watch DVDs, read books and articles. But where the hunger for additional information in a clinic context comes from is understanding how a person gets from A to B,... how to successfully apply concepts (including incremental application). As an example, as I read through (highlight, re-read, work with my horse,... return to the article, "True Collection".... and back to my horse,... etc,...), I find that in the 'practical application' of the concepts, as viewed from the back of my horse, I believe that I am applying concepts as I intend to,.. and I will practice accordingly. But I ride mostly alone (and am a student of new concepts,... practicing with my horse)... and then someone will happen-by, take note and will offer some well intentioned feed back,.... "Do you realize that you are doing this and consequently your horse is doing this....?" And what I hear is that I have been (unwittingly) NOT applying the concepts as I thought I was,... And as I reflect on this, I realize that I did not really know what to look for as evidence of successful application of a concept,...(in progress, as I am riding).

So, perhaps a clinic context DVD that focuses on "how to" apply concepts e.g. what does it look like (while riding) to 'effectively' ask/invite a horse to release his topline and invite the coil of the loin? When viewed from the ground, this can be seen,... but from the horse's back, (when first learning the concept) it is not easy to see (or feel,... the nuances of the beginning muscle changes). What does incremental success look like when beginning to 'train' or 're-train' these concepts of collection,... what is evidence that things are not going as they should and what other methods should be considered etc,.... a life time of concepts/learning.

Today, we (many of us) do not have the opportunity to ride in an environment where there are like-minded people/instructors,... and active, live feedback,... as in the schools of yesteryear,...

The point here is many people ride alone,... and for those who do ride with others, those who want to ride with a reverence for the horse are fewer still,... so experimentation occurs in a bit of a vacuum,...

There are very few DVDs (that I have found) that actually show 'how' to get from a concept to its successful application,... that show the nuances of progress (as viewed through the lens of the rider),... recognizing that the nuances are many.

This is not to say, that a clinic based 'how to' DVD is a substitution for "try" and consistent work, observation, "re-try", but it would help (really help) to know that one is at least headed to Rome,... on the many roads to Rome.

Thank-you Dr Deb. for your dedication and life work to the pursuit and sharing of knowledge,.... ultimately for the well-being of the horse. Thank-you

DrDeb
Super Moderator
 

Joined: Fri Mar 30th, 2007
Location:  
Posts: 3295
Status:  Offline
OK, I hear what you-all are saying. Now I need to ask: to which of our RECOMMENDED clinicians have you actually gone in the past two years?

In other words: if you want and need live instruction, do you actively seek it out?

Our RECOMMENDED list of clinicians includes (and a reminder, these are the only names you may mention in this Forum):

Harry Whitney

Buck Brannaman

Bryan Neubert & Son

Joe Wolter

Melanie Smith-Taylor

Tom Curtin

Ty Weber

Josh Nichol

Lendon Gray

George Morris

Mike Schaffer

How people get on our recommended list is:

1. They understand not only techniques but the actual meaning that the techniques have to the horse; this is what 'deep work' is.

2. They have no interest in a personal fan club. They do not self-promote beyond letting people know where and when their services are available. As Ray Hunt used to say: "It doesn't matter to me whether you people are here or not. I would have been working these colts anyway."

3. They charge reasonable rates to riders and pay their sponsors' expenses.

4. They treat every participant equally. There are no 'cliques', 'in crowds', 'franchises', 'special lists' or 'certifications' -- every participant has equal access to the teacher, and every participant is encouraged to ask questions.

5. They go out of their way to be good teachers. While all have been students themselves, having had teachers of their own, they do not mindlessly parrot a guru, but instead offer students their own best interpretation of what they themselves have learned, not only from their teacher(s) but from their own experience.

6. Their horses are content and capable in their work; they do not become frightened or tense when called upon to work. Their horses are their highest recommendation.

 

Brandy
Member
 

Joined: Mon Aug 10th, 2009
Location:  
Posts: 31
Status:  Offline
I needed a lot more help than DVDs could provide; I went to Buck for the first time five years ago and go to two or three clinics (with my horse) every year. The more I learn, the more I realize there is to know (that I don't know yet) and the more I want to know. That there is no end but always help along the way was one of the first and most exciting things I learned from Buck.

As far as DVDs, I have some but don't watch them a lot. I use them for reminders of what I need to go outside and do with my horse, and to a certain degree to get close and repeated observations of tiny details that are hard to catch in real time.

Kuhaylan Heify
Member
 

Joined: Fri Jan 30th, 2015
Location:  
Posts: 84
Status:  Offline
Dear Brandy: You're right about the being able to watch bits of the tapes over and over to pickup details..I've had luck getting sidekick to relax and focus doing Bucks ,'teach them not to get their feet stuck so they don't kill themselves in the trailer,' exercise..
best wishes
Bruce Peek

Capparella
Member
 

Joined: Mon Nov 24th, 2014
Location: North Carolina USA
Posts: 41
Status:  Offline
I am new to this school and to horses. I did not know about these clinicians (except Buck) before, so I have plans to audit every one I can as several are coming to a state nearby this year. Since I am new, I do not feel I will be qualified to have my own horse for several years. While the ideal would be to participate, at least I can audit them.

I feel there is no substitute for real life time with a clinician. Clinician videos are great reinforcers in between times.

Regarding the comment on working alone, it may be helpful to video yourself. I have rigged a tripod and videoed my lessons with my phone. I then convert to DVD and watch on a large screen. This has been immensely helpful, as I can see "outside" of myself and connect it to what I was feeling when engaging in a movement. I can also see more of the horse. In the beginning it seems difficult to take in all the foot movement, the neck, the eye etc. at once. I am gradually getting better at taking in more visual information and feeling more of the horse. So when my teacher tells me I am late on a release or I have not set the horse up well to untrack I can see the opening I missed.

JulietMacie
Member


Joined: Tue Jun 25th, 2013
Location: Ashfield, Massachusetts USA
Posts: 96
Status:  Offline
I audited a Buck clinic last September and got a tremendous amount of learning out of it! In fact, I was even wondering, as I sat watching, asking questions and taking notes, if I was able to get more out of auditing than I would from participating! I plan to go to a Bettina Drummond clinic (again as an auditor) later this month and hopefully to a Bryan Neubert clinic this summer. I just wish more of the recommended clinicians came to New England so I could attend clinics oftener and someday bring my horse.
--Juliet

sumosha
Member
 

Joined: Tue Jan 3rd, 2012
Location:  
Posts: 11
Status:  Offline
Hi Juliet!
Mike Schaffer is on the East Coast (PA / NJ area). I'm not sure of his clinic schedule, but I have actually been doing Skype lessons with him! It's pretty neat - I take a video of me riding and/or doing ground work, and we conference call over the internet to discuss the video. I'm finding it incredibly productive, not to mention far less stressful (I can video and ride whenever I want). I've been working with him for the last 6 months, I've noticed tremendous results, and am excited about my future work with him.

JulietMacie
Member


Joined: Tue Jun 25th, 2013
Location: Ashfield, Massachusetts USA
Posts: 96
Status:  Offline
Hi Sumosha

thanks for your suggestion! I've actually been considering embarking on video lessons with Mike Schaffer for a while now. I have to figure out a process so I can do it with minimal technical and logistical headaches, but I think I might go for it this summer. --Juliet

JaneW
Guest
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status:  Offline
Dr. Deb:
In answer to your question, I've been to Buck and Harry and one other person not on your list. Twenty years ago I was quite the clinic junkie - now I find riding in one GOOD clinic a year with someone I trust gives me plenty to work on.

sumosha
Member
 

Joined: Tue Jan 3rd, 2012
Location:  
Posts: 11
Status:  Offline
Hi Juliet,

Nowadays regular digital cameras are sufficient for up to 30 minutes video, which usually is enough time for our lessons because we pause, slow down, step through, and discuss. I bought a Canon Elph 130 and a quality SD card (class 10) for less than $150. I record at the low quality setting (640x480), which is good enough with decent lighting. Higher quality won't get more than 10 mins of video with my barebones hardware setup.

Also, I bought a gorillapod tripod. They are flexible tripods where you can attach the legs around tree branches (or posts in the arena). This setup works beautifully for me so I can tape without assistance.

My biggest problem is staying in the picture frame! Sometimes I set up cones at the boundaries of the screen and then just ride within them.

Hope that helps. Good luck! Also, I love the threads you've been driving. I've been learning a lot from your journey. :)

CorynKiefer
Member
 

Joined: Sun Apr 5th, 2015
Location: British Columbia Canada
Posts: 3
Status:  Offline
Dr Deb,

In the last 2 years I have attended 2 Josh Nichol clinics (and will be 3 at the end of this year). Josh is an excellent clinician,...not only a gifted horseman but also a gifted educator. I have learned much from him and look forward to learning more,…

However, after a couple of months of working/practicing the concepts that I learn from his clinics, I begin to question myself about whether I am still doing things correctly. And without the feedback (or reference to 'see'/review) to validate what I think/hope I am doing, I get bogged down,... It is in this context that I go back and make reference to DVDs (like Buck Brannaman),... but I find the DVDs (generally speaking) help more with 'keeping me pointed in a direction,... where I want to get to,... rather than providing the information of this is 'how' you get to where you want to go).

The idea of using a video camera is good,... and making use of it right after the clinic, while concepts are fresh and clear,... where I can self-check for correctness over the passage of time,...

Still, in response to Dr Deb's first questions (post) from February 03,… what would help me become a ‘relatively’ proficient and independent horsewoman,…

Well first and foremost,… I would want to take a clinic with Dr Deb,… which may or may not be possible,… (oh Santa,… please,… :-) ),

And because I make regular use of DVDs (for reference),… I know that I would continue to learn ‘more better’ with DVDs (or Youtube lectures) that help to explain concepts,…how to get from Pt A to Pt B,… and that help explain what correct looks like (and/or incorrect looks like),… and “why” this is correct/incorrect. Likely a clinic context given that there are different people and horses each with their own unique ‘ways’,… would provide for good examples but there are other possibilities. For example, I found Dr Deb’s lectures (You-Tube) from the George Morris clinic *very* informing,… and because of the visual references,… the biomechanical examples I now “see” (can visualize) the movement (spine, withers) of my horse differently ( (in part) jaw flexions (ala Baucher),… or what Buck Brannaman refers to as picking up a “soft feel” as well as the concept of raising/lifting the withers),… I now have a clear picture of what these concepts mean (look like) and of what both correct/incorrect looks like. Very few clinicians teach this way (use these kinds of visual references,… explain things thoroughly),…. Very helpful in my learning....on the path of becoming a proficient and independent horsewoman. I welcome more of that kind of instruction.
Thank-you!!

ilam
Member
 

Joined: Sat Apr 30th, 2011
Location: Texas USA
Posts: 59
Status:  Offline
I have ridden only with Buck in the last 5 years, rode once with Tom Curtin before that, which is what got me starting in riding in clinics. Recently I audited another clinician that is not on the recommended list (because it was close to my home), I had just seen him present at the Legacy of Legends and was curious why he is not on the list.

I have books and quite a number of DVDs, because "immersion therapy" is my thing, but while those things help with snippets at times and with some theoretical understanding, there is no substitute for the live experience of riding in a clinic with the right instructor. As I get in a wee bit deeper each time, the wealth of information gained gets wider. A funny thing always happens, while there are a lot of people in Buck's clinics from all walks of life and all levels of experience, somehow I get to see and learn exactly what I need to see and learn at each particular time. It just always works out that way.

Then there is this other thing I get out of clinics, it was also there are the Legacy of Legends (not from everyone that was there, but from the majority of them there), and I cannot describe in words what this is. It comes from the people you meet there that are there for the horse only, and I cannot get enough of it. I grew up in a different world, I still work in a different world, and that world needs a whole lot more of THIS, this thing that you can feel. It has something to do with relinquishing one's ego, that is definitely part of it. You cannot get that from books or DVDs, you have to get it with the help of the people that live by example.

Isabel

DrDeb
Super Moderator
 

Joined: Fri Mar 30th, 2007
Location:  
Posts: 3295
Status:  Offline
Dear People: I wanted to bump this thread back up to the top with a notice, in case some of you had not seen my previous rave review in other threads -- Melanie Smith-Taylor's new book, "Ridiing With Life: Lessons from the Horse" is now out and available.

This is one of the best books you could possibly get if what you want is detailed instruction and guidance in our approach to horsemanship. It works for any style of horsemanship, although of course Melanie's specialty is show jumping (she's the 1984 Olympic gold medalist) -- so another good function of this book is to help bridge the gap for those who ride "English" but can't get their horse to do what they were hoping it would do. Melanie's book takes you through the first exercises in mannering and "starting", right up through advanced jump gymnastics and courses.

Least expensive and best way to obtain it is to go to http://www.taylormadehorsemanship.com -- it's currently featured on their home page.

Highly recommended to one and all. Cheers -- Dr. Deb

 

 




Powered by WowBB 1.7 - Copyright © 2003-2006 Aycan Gulez