ESI Q and A Forums Home
 Search       Members   Calendar   Help   Home 
Search by username
Not logged in - Login | Register 

White spots
 Moderated by: DrDeb  
 New Topic   Reply   Print 
AuthorPost
katie
Member
 

Joined: Thu Jul 19th, 2012
Location:  
Posts: 6
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Sun Jul 6th, 2014 09:30 pm
 Quote  Reply 
A mare I am working with has an unusual hair pattern left after shedding out last spring. Over her back and on her sides she has long winter hair left in a sort of waffle pattern. It is July and it is showing no signs of shedding out. Yesterday I noticed that the hair is beginning to turn white. I have attached a photo of her taken yesterday.

She has been worked lightly about 2-3 days a week since Jan. in a round pen with a saddle on her, no rider. (The larger white spots in the middle of her back, behind her withers appeared a couple of years ago, and again she had only been ridden lightly with what seemed to be at the time a well fitting saddle, a David Genadek saddle).

Any thoughts on this?

Attachment: IMG_1938 copy.jpg (Downloaded 308 times)

Last edited on Sun Jul 6th, 2014 09:31 pm by katie

DrDeb
Super Moderator
 

Joined: Fri Mar 30th, 2007
Location:  
Posts: 3244
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Mon Jul 7th, 2014 02:53 am
 Quote  Reply 
Looks like whatever saddle you've been using on this horse does not fit, Katie. The whitening of the hair is caused by pressure from the saddle having killed the cells embedded in the skin that inject melanin into the growing hair shafts. Once those cells die, they don't come back, so the hair follicles they once served thereafter produce hair shafts that have no melanin grains in them; these appear white when seen in a patch or group.

If you feel different texture to the skin in these areas, i.e. if it feels thicker, or if the hair seems to shed out more slowly or sticks up higher than the normal, chestnut-colored hair that is nearby, this is also due to damage from the ill-fitting saddle.

There is also a (more remote) possibility that the horse has had chronic rain-rot, mange, or some other skin condition; this can be evaluated by a veterinarian if you think it's a possibility. But otherwise, I'm betting on "bad saddle fit."

So the very first thing for you is to correct your mistake by learning what you need to know about how to select and fit a saddle. You do this by going to our faculty saddlemaker's website -- our Institute saddlemaker is Dave Genadek -- and his website is http://www.aboutthehorse.com. You go there and you search for his beautifully produced, one-hour video/DVD program called "About Saddle Fit," and you buy it at the price asked, which is not very high because Dave sells the program "at cost". You will, in addition, find not one single advertisement in that DVD, nor any attempt whatsoever to get you to buy his saddles rather than another maker's. What is in that program is the one and only thing we're interested in, and that is accurate information that, if you will but absorb it, will empower you through knowledge.

You can and should also go look up any of Dave G.'s threads in this Forum, because a lot of them contain links or information as to how you can participate in his online "webinars" which would enable you to talk more or less "live" with Dave during the class, show him pictures, and ask questions directly.

That you had used a Dave Genadek saddle previously means absolutely nothing, because undoubtedly the particular saddle you used was not made by Dave for this particular horse. Last I checked, Dave had four different saddle trees, and if Dave does not have a tree that he considers will fit your horse, he will not sell you any saddle. In other words: the tree is the basis for fit, and you must have the correct tree (to begin with) for fit to happen. It is a common, but as you now see a false, belief that "one saddle will fit all." There are a lot of manufacturers who train salespeople to give out this lie: but it is still a lie. So, somewhere or other, that saddle or some other saddle that you may also have used was catching your mare square across the spine.

That the riding was "light" means nothing, either. You can create death in the melanin-producing cells with 2 lbs. of excess pressure in fifteen minutes.

So -- let's have another go at this saddle-fit business and let's get it right this time. It might be instructive for other readers here, as well as helpful to me, if you would also post a good conformation photo of the horse -- we could then judge how "downhill" her build is, or see other factors that might enable us to advise you. Undoubtedly David will be looking at this thread also, and you (and the horse) will be the beneficiaries. -- Dr. Deb

renoo
Member


Joined: Wed Mar 28th, 2007
Location: Latvia
Posts: 72
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Tue Jul 22nd, 2014 07:16 pm
 Quote  Reply 
since one of my hobbies is horse color genetics, it looks prety much like lacing (google it). I don't know much about it, since its very rare, though.

saddle fit comes first, of course.

katie
Member
 

Joined: Thu Jul 19th, 2012
Location:  
Posts: 6
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Wed Oct 14th, 2015 09:52 am
 Quote  Reply 
We had already changed the saddle, sorry I hadn't mentioned it. I mentioned the white spots only so I could separate them from the white waffle pattern.

Renoo, thanks for the info. I googled lacing and it does seem to be that. Always something new to learn!

Last edited on Wed Oct 14th, 2015 09:53 am by katie

DrDeb
Super Moderator
 

Joined: Fri Mar 30th, 2007
Location:  
Posts: 3244
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Wed Oct 14th, 2015 10:57 am
 Quote  Reply 
Katie, look in Dr. Phil Sponenberg's horse color book, latest edition, for a photo of a horse showing this reticulated pattern very strongly. -- Dr. Deb

katie
Member
 

Joined: Thu Jul 19th, 2012
Location:  
Posts: 6
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Wed Oct 14th, 2015 10:59 am
 Quote  Reply 
Thanks, I'll check it out.


 Current time is 09:07 pm




Powered by WowBB 1.7 - Copyright © 2003-2006 Aycan Gulez