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BELUCH saddlebags
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sarahmorloff
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 Posted: Mon Aug 13th, 2012 12:46 am
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This item was given to me by a family friend who acquired it from his brother (now deceased).  The brother used to own and raise TB race horses.  I have no idea how he got it, but I do know that he and his brother were collectors of EVERYTHING.  Unfortunately our friend couldn't tell us anything about it.  He just gave it to me knowing my interest and love of horses.

The closest thing I could find about it is that it may be a BELUCH saddlebag.  I recognize the Middle East / Oriental workmanship as my Father, through his travels, acquired several hand woven Persian, Turkish, Arabic, Armenian and Afghan carpets. 

I through it over my horse to see the effect of it, but it hung way low... so then I flipped it around and folded it... WALLAH... it turned into the bags shown online.

I am going to try and post pictures. 

Any info or insight to this interesting item would be much appreciated.  I am curious if it is worth anything or where exactly it was made or what it was used for.

Thanks =D

Attachment: Saddle pad 1sml.JPG (Downloaded 272 times)

Last edited on Mon Aug 13th, 2012 02:14 am by DrDeb

sarahmorloff
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 Posted: Mon Aug 13th, 2012 12:48 am
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More pictures.

Attachment: saddle pad 3sml.JPG (Downloaded 266 times)

sarahmorloff
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 Posted: Mon Aug 13th, 2012 12:48 am
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Folded... if the sides were sewn down then you would be able to put things down into the decorative area from the centered areas. (hope that makes sense).

Attachment: saddle pad 4sml.JPG (Downloaded 267 times)

Last edited on Mon Aug 13th, 2012 12:53 am by sarahmorloff

sarahmorloff
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 Posted: Mon Aug 13th, 2012 12:49 am
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Hung over chair while folded.  More accurate as to how it would hang length wise over a horse.

Attachment: saddle pad 5sml.JPG (Downloaded 266 times)

DrDeb
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 Posted: Mon Aug 13th, 2012 02:15 am
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Sarah, is 'Beluch' a tribe of people? or is the word a brand name? -- Dr. Deb

sarahmorloff
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 Posted: Mon Aug 13th, 2012 02:26 am
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OH MY!!!  I didn't even think to look it up... I just assumed it was a style...

I looked it up and this is what I found:
 
Beluch From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Beluch or the Baluch of Turkmenistan are a small part of the greater Baloch people who live primarily in Pakistan, Iran and Afghanistan. They immigrated into the Merv and the Murghab River inland delta from the areas west and north of Herat, Afghanistan and Iran in the mid 19th century. More followed in the early 20th century and closure of the Russian/Soviet borders under Stalin in 1925.
The Mervi Beluch are closely related to those Baloch in Afghanistan and Iran who live nearly the modern borders of Turkmenistan. Today they are the only Iranic peoples remaining in the Merv Oasia, after the ancient Persian population of the area was deported on mass to Bukhara and Samarkand by the Manghit emir, Shah Murad in the late 1780s. Their fault being their Shia religion. Except for these Baluch, the entire ancient oasis is now Turkified, with the Turkmens forming a vast majority of the population.
Most of the Baluch, however, are losing their linguistic identity, speaking the official language of Turkmenisan, Turkmeni or Russian. A few, however, continue to speak Baluchi (and even some Brahui language).
In 1926 the Baluch of Merv Oasis numbered 9,974. Their numbers fell to 7,842 in the official statistics by 1959 but then rose to 12,582 by 1970 and 18,997 by 1979.
The Baluch are primarily Muslims, practicing Hanafi branch of Sunnism.

Last edited on Mon Aug 13th, 2012 02:27 am by sarahmorloff

sarahmorloff
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 Posted: Mon Aug 13th, 2012 02:39 am
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With understanding that this was a tribe or people, I did a little digging.  I found a great website about this culture... especially its rugs (as that's what they used for bartering apparently)... I am comparing the designs to see if there happens to be any resemblance to any specific time period =D  Fun stuff!!

http://www.tcoletribalrugs.com/article9baluch.html  This is the website.


Last edited on Mon Aug 13th, 2012 02:41 am by DrDeb

DrDeb
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 Posted: Wed Aug 15th, 2012 05:53 pm
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Sarah, you might have more luck getting an answer on this if you posted it at an anthropology site, the site for a museum of natural history or the National Museum of American History. You can EMail them and perhaps a staff member can either help you or direct you. -- Dr. Deb

sarahmorloff
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 Posted: Wed Aug 15th, 2012 08:29 pm
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Thank you, that's a great idea!!

ruth
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 Posted: Thu Aug 16th, 2012 03:26 pm
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Sarah, does it have slot openings in the centre, can't see from the photos, but if so could be for a camel saddle. Had one similar bought from the Bedou many years ago. Regards, Ruth

Joe
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 Posted: Wed Nov 21st, 2012 03:30 am
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Or you could look in books or on line resources about tribal-made rugs. This is almost certainly a tribal -made item (made in a village by ordinary people as opposed to something made in a commercial "manufacturing center") If you can find the pattern, you will generally find a clue as to the geography of the source as the tribes tended to stick to characteristic patterns.

The fly in the ointment is that a lot of tribal patterns are now counterfeited in Pakistan and India -- but that does not look much like the counterfeits I have seen. they are usually rugs made for export.

Anyway, the rug books and sites often contain images of other, similar textiles. I've seen bags similar to yours.

Another resource would the the Textile Museum in Washington, DC. It is a fine institution with a knowledgable staff. The Curator of Eastern Hemisphere Collections is my brother-in-law, Lee Talbot. He is very approachable and will doubtless tell you what he can.

Joe Sullivan


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