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Query about cinches and girths
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DrDeb
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 Posted: Mon Aug 15th, 2011 07:14 pm
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Dr Deb - I would appreciate your opinion on neoprene cinches. What is the best material for a western cinch?  

Thank you.

Reply from Dr. Deb:

Evermore, if this query turns out to be not a real query, but instead a way to engender discussion or to steer the discussion toward some cinch that you get a commission for selling, this post will be deleted and you will be banned from the Forum. This is our policy all the time -- no exceptions, and no second chances.

Also: it is ever so easy to start a new thread. Just use the "new topic" button at the upper right of the Forum board page, where all the threads are shown. Your query is irrelevant to the discussion on "short strided behind" -- could you not have begun a new thread? Therefore I am moving this post and Adam's reply to a new thread. -- Dr. Deb

 

DrDeb
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 Posted: Mon Aug 15th, 2011 07:16 pm
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Reply from Adam Till:

Mohair....breathable, long-lasting, some give available. Make sure it's not just a low-percentage blend, however.

Evermore
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 Posted: Mon Aug 15th, 2011 07:42 pm
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Thank you for starting a new post for me. I am more of a reader than a poster!

I have absolutely no motive for getting your opinion other than the fact that I respect your opinion. I do not have any commercial interest. I only want my horse to be comfortable and happy.

I do not want to worry that I am inflicting some unrecognized discomfort!

I have devoured and implemented your insight on so many subjects on this forum. I have purchased Inner Horseman disks, the Birdie Book and the CD, and the Bitting DVD. I have listened to the Mannering CD and the Birdie CD fifteen times - and get something more each time! I will not bore you with all I have learned from the materials you have produced and the information given freely on this forum.

This is a real query. I want to learn.

 

 

 

 

 

David Genadek
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 Posted: Tue Aug 16th, 2011 02:56 am
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Saddle Pads: Best Shock Absorber Identified in Study
by: Nancy Zacks • August 02 2011 • Article # 18622
If you've ever been in the market for a new saddle pad, you know there are a myriad of types to choose from. Many horse owners search for a product that reduces the pressure on their horse's back when working under saddle, and a team of Austrian researchers recently set out to determine what material might be best suited for the task.
Of four saddle pad materials (gel, leather, foam, and reindeer fur) tested by the Movement Science Group of the University of Veterinary Medicine in Vienna, Austria, reindeer fur provided the best shock absorption at the walk and sitting trot, according to a study.
"Saddle fit involves individual adaptation," said Christian Peham, head of the Movement Science Group, "It is difficult to make a general recommendation about the best material, but reindeer fur showed the best results."
The research team tested the four commonly used saddle pad materials by placing a pressure-sensing mat under the pad used beneath a well-fitting saddle. They recorded the forces on the backs of 16 sound horses of different breeds and ages ridden on a treadmill at a walk and a sitting trot. For comparison, the same horses were tested without a saddle pad at the same gaits.
None of the materials adversely affected saddle fit compared to no pad, the researchers noted, but the reindeer fur pad decreased forces on the back significantly when compared to forces recorded without a pad.
Movement dynamics are crucial when evaluating materials, according to Peham. "We saw that soft materials can sometimes harden with higher impact (as in trot). "Faster motion can also affect the ability for the material to relax."
The current study emphasizes that a well-chosen saddle pad can reduce the pressure on a horse's back when used with a well-fit saddle. Regardless of the material, "riders should check saddle fit regularly," said Peham.
The study, "The effects of different saddle pads on forces and pressure distribution beneath a fitting saddle," was published in the Equine Veterinary Journal. The abstract is available online.

I think the same concepts apply to the underside of the horse. We are a 100% Mohair around here and I even wear Mohair socks.

Last edited on Tue Aug 16th, 2011 02:58 am by David Genadek

DrDeb
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 Posted: Tue Aug 16th, 2011 06:40 am
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Do they itch?? Oy, veh....

David Genadek
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 Posted: Tue Aug 16th, 2011 01:46 pm
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No not at all. I can't wear sheeps wool but I can wear mohair. I even got a mohair stocking cap pulls the sweat from my head. The socks are done from young goats the old goats hair would probable be itchy. As a rule Cinch cord is made from the hair of old goats.

DrDeb
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 Posted: Tue Aug 16th, 2011 07:46 pm
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Well, I've known a few old goats myself....

I expect that what would be itchy to the human, with our mostly hairless skin, would not bother a horse through his fur. So the horse can deal with the old goat just fine, even if we can't. I think the point made by Adam is relevant, though: it's certainly likely that some cinches and saddle pads are made with a "mohair blend" that would turn out to be, say, 10% mohair and 90% "industrial fiber" which means "recycled automobile upholstery." -- Dr. Deb

Blaze
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 Posted: Thu Aug 18th, 2011 04:09 am
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I'm wondering about the reindeer saddle pad....would that be from a reindeer with its winter coat or one shedded out?

I've had great experience with 100% mohair cinches. They are a bit spendier. With any string cinch check it over to make sure all the knots are flat and well secured - nothing sticking up to rub the horse.

I personally use a roper style cinch, although I do not rope. I feel the wider area under the horse's belly disburses pressure better. Just be careful that as the cinch flares out to the wider point in the middle that it doesn't poke the horse in the armpit and cause a rub.


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