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News Flash from ESI Office
 Moderated by: DrDeb  
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DrDeb
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Joined: Fri Mar 30th, 2007
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 Posted: Wed Aug 8th, 2007 06:58 am
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Dear Folks -- I want to announce that the 2007 mid-year edition of "The Inner Horseman" is just out. It's a whopper -- about 160 pages all told, with news, classic Forum discussions from the past, and an extra-extra big book review section this time. 

Half the issue, though -- 86 pages, so big it's contained in its own file -- is the last installment of "Grand-Dad's Horses" -- featuring the Quarter Horse. This should engage a large number of people, since the Quarter Horse is the world's largest registering organization and also the world's largest horse enthusiasts' club, with over 350,000 dues-paying members and more than 3 million registered horses.

The Quarter Horse report contains historical photos, a discussion of the beginnings of the breed in Colonial Virginia; what the source of the 'short speed' is; information about the original founding stallions (*Janus, Printer, Shiloh, Steel Dust, i.e., horses from the 18th and early 19th centuries); how the breed came to Texas; and what happened after that, right up to the present. I've researched over 50 different important historical pedigrees (Doc Bar, Impressive, The Old Sorrel, Leo, Poco Bueno II, Skipper W., Clabber, Go Man Go, and many more), taking the pedigrees back more than five generations, in many cases right back to the "beginning". I hope this will be helpful to many readers who own or appreciate Quarter Horses and that it will make enjoyable reading for everyone.

It's also neat, I think, that the Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse reports appear on the same disk -- as always we re-cut the January issue onto the same disk as the mid-year issue. The Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse are sister-breeds, and many QH's have Thoroughbreds in their family tree. Having both breeds on one disk makes looking up the TB side of the pedigree easy. In many cases you can take a horse right back to Herod or Matchem or Eclipse, or, I should say more importantly, you can ultimately find out how many crosses your Skipper W.-bred horse carries to Old Bald Peg. Who the heck is Old Bald Peg, you ask? Read and find out! She's probably the most important mare in horse-breeding history!

I have one other announcement to make as well: this will be the last issue of "The Inner Horseman". We will not be producing any more. From here on out, when a person takes out an Associate Membership, they may select ANY issue as their membership benefit, going back to 2001. If you already have all 7 issues (covering 11 years, since the 2001 disk carries also the years 1997-2000) -- then, if you still desire to be an Associate Member of Equine Studies Institute, we will accept donations, 100% of which will go to support the expenses of maintaining this Forum and Website.

Please don't get the idea that Equine Studies Institute is going out of business. The MAIN reason I'm closing down "The Inner Horseman" is that I no longer have time to produce it. We have SOOOOOOO many other things going on, but some of them are just not advancing because there's no time. The newsletter takes me from 1 to 2 months to prepare, full time I mean, per EACH issue. That's why they've been such a good value, of course....a lot of TLC has gone into their preparation. But at this point, if we want to get some on-line interactive courses worked up....if we want more and better DVD programs available....if I'm ever to get my anatomy books done....then something has to give.

Through the end of this calendar year, all the PayPal buttons will remain as they currently are -- you can certainly still sign up for Associate Membership this year, and until December 31, 2007, if you do sign up you will receive the wonderful TB and QH disk that I described above. After that -- it's onward and upward to achieving some works that we've been looking forward to completing.

Best wishes, and my thanks as always to all our Associate Members for their continuing belief in, and support of, the work we do here. -- Dr. Deb

 

Last edited on Sat Aug 11th, 2007 07:05 am by DrDeb

Tasha
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Joined: Thu Mar 22nd, 2007
Location: South Island, New Zealand
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 Posted: Sun Aug 12th, 2007 10:32 pm
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I'll miss the Inner Horseman but it sounds like you have some great projects in the works which will be great trade off.

I do have one question. I seem to have misplaced my copy of the 2005 Inner Horseman. Is it possible to get a replacement disc?

DrDeb
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 Posted: Mon Aug 13th, 2007 08:45 am
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Yes, Tasha, all you have to do is go over to the "Bookstore" section of this Website (http://www.equinestudies.org) and use the PayPal buttons to purchase another one. -- Dr. Deb

DrDeb
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 Posted: Wed Aug 22nd, 2007 01:06 am
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Dear People -- This is an "all points bulletin" trying to locate Glenice Dunbar, who lives in Novato, California.

Glenice -- if you or one of your friends is reading this Forum, I need you to EMail the ESI office at your earliest convenience. You ordered something from us recently but the item was returned to us as being undeliverable to the address you provided.

We'd like to get your item to you, but we're stuck with no EMail address for you and no viable snailmail either.

I hope this message does find you! EMail us at office@equinestudies.org. Thanks! -- Dr. Deb

DrDeb
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 Posted: Thu Aug 23rd, 2007 02:04 am
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Dear People -- I have another request for help with the Poison Plants book. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture website, which gives distributional data for all kinds of plant species, the Buckeye or Horse Chestnut tree (genus Aesculus) occurs in California, where our offices are -- as well as in other parts of the U.S. and Canada.

I've been told by one of my neighbors whose job gets him around to the outback regions fairly often, that he can recall having seen one of these trees -- but naturally he can't exactly remember where it was. Very frustrating!!

What I need is either directions from somebody who lives in California -- can you tell me where we can go to photograph this type of tree?

OR -- a volunteer from any state where the Buckeye or Horse Chestnut grows, who is willing to send us good, clear photographs of this tree.

The images that are needed are:

(1) View of the whole tree

(2) Closer view to show the form of the leaves

(3) Flowers (would have to be taken in springtime)

(4) Some of the buckeyes, either still on the tree or attached to a branch that has fallen off or been cut off.

(5) Trunk, showing how the bark looks.

The flower shot would be optional (nice if we can get it); the others are necessary.

We can use shots (or location directions) for any or all of the following species:

Aesculus californica (California buckeye)

Aesculus glabra (Ohio buckeye)

Aesculus hippocastanum (Horse chestnut)

Aesculus octandra (Yellow buckeye)

Aesculus pavia (Red buckeye).

Thanks very much -- we need this info ASAP -- if you send photos that are good enough for us to use, we will reward you with a free Birdie Book or equivalent. Please EMail us at office@equinestudies.org -- Dr. Deb

Pam
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Joined: Wed Mar 21st, 2007
Location: Lafayette, California USA
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 Posted: Thu Aug 23rd, 2007 06:02 pm
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Dr. Deb,

The California Buckeye tree is seen in my town (Lafayette), around and at the reservoir.  I've seen them growing all over the Bay Area as well.  Actually, the Lafayette Reservoir is a great source for pictures, for any of the California native plants and trees that you might need.

I can get pictures and samples for you.  Gotta wait until spring for the flowers though.

Pam

DrDeb
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 Posted: Thu Aug 23rd, 2007 07:38 pm
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Pam, thanks very much. I have two weeks here, or just shy, before I go off for a month to the U.K. for my yearly romp through the Vindolanda bone pile. Lafayette is relatively close to me so I will plan on driving up there. It will be a very worthwhile trip -- I did not know there was a good park there -- and maybe in the parts where they haven't mowed it, I will also be able to find some Bishop's Weed, which supposedly grows in Contra Costa and Sonoma counties. Plus the horse chestnut!

You can take photos too, if you wish; I'll be glad to review them. And you might be in a better position to jump over quick to the park just at the time when the trees are in flower come spring. I am trying to get the book done before then, BUT I would never pass up an opportunity to revise and upgrade. So, send photo disks to:

Equine Studies Institute

P.O. Box 411

Livingston, CA 95334

 

Pam
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Joined: Wed Mar 21st, 2007
Location: Lafayette, California USA
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 Posted: Thu Aug 23rd, 2007 09:55 pm
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Dr. Deb,

There is one buckeye tree in particular that is growing right outside the Lafayette Reservoir that is spectacular (it was there last time I was there).  If you are driving out of the reservoir you would turn right onto Mt. Diablo Blvd.  It is right off the right side of the road.  Actually there are buckeye trees all around Lafayette.  I think they have survived because in general people are really into the California native plants in my area.  The Orchard Nursery, which is just down the street from the reservoir, has a huge selection of the California native plants for sale as well.  I may have seen the Bishops weed/flower at the reservoir but I thought it was Queen Ann's Lace, which is a common mistaken.  So you might get lucky there.  If you walk the trail that goes around the reservoir you will see lots of different species.  They keep things in a pretty natural state.  

I will take pictures anyway and send them to you and for sure in the spring when the trees are flowering. 

Happy plant hunting!

Pam 

 

Carole
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Joined: Thu Aug 23rd, 2007
Location: Healdsburg, California USA
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 Posted: Thu Aug 23rd, 2007 10:10 pm
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Dr. Deb, Regarding Aesculus Californica, it's widespread in the Coast Range and Sierra Foothills from Siskiyou County south to Los Angeles and Kern County. When you looks at the hills now, it is the small tree that has either yellowing or dead leaves. It is summer dormant, so has a very distinctive look this time of year which would be good for a photo, along with a spring foliage and flower photo, they bloom May through late June. Perhaps the California Native Plant Society would allow some of their photos to be used?  
  I learned of you from Stuart Greenberg, I took his Farrier Science for the Horseowner class at SRJC last fall. I mailed a membership request to your office recently and am eagerly reading the forum and practicing lessons 1 and 2 from the horse confidence forum. We're progressing well and am looking forward to number 3.
                                                                                               Thank you,
                                                                                                Carole


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