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The Human's birdie
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jwheeler
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 Posted: Wed Jul 11th, 2007 01:46 pm
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All this fuss lately has got me thinking -

- about distractions and how easily humans (or maybe just this human) let themselves be distracted.

If I expect to be able to control my horse's "birdie", perhaps I'd better work a bit on my own.  For example when I ride, I may go out in the field still thinking about the last customer of the day, or my discussion with my boss.  I'm certainly not focused on my horse.  If I am still focused on those things, is it fair to ask my horse to focus on something other than the grass beneath his feet?  (Maybe a re-reading of The Power of Now is in order?)

- and about the roles of student and teacher.  What role do I assume with my horse?  Am I the teacher and am I clear about that with the horse?  All the time?  Does he know what my expectations are?  And when he doesn't understand, what does he use to communicate that to me?  And do I understand?  I have a an older gelding I raised and trained before I learned there might be another way to work with the horse.  When he doesn't understand, he shuts down, just stops - as if to say "You figure it out.  It's safer if I do nothing then to do something and be wrong."  On the other hand I have a younger horse that will switch her tail first and if I ignore that, she'll paw, and (although I have learned not to) if I ignore that, will start to pop up, very gently on her front end.

Thanks for the review of my horsemanship.

renoo
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 Posted: Thu Jul 12th, 2007 02:54 pm
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Simple as that - horse is somewhat like a computer - the computer doesn't do what you want it to do, but what you make it to do.

Sam
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 Posted: Fri Jul 13th, 2007 08:13 am
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Hi Folks,

I have just written a whole lot of stuff for this thread, and I went back to review JWheeler's original post, ( not realising it was on the bottom of this page)  and the computer ate my stuff,  just like a horse, sometimes you press a button and get something completely unexpected!!!!  My 'human birdie' used to be anyplace but with the animal I was working with, it is only recently I became 'aware' of this and now my motto is to 'Stay Present' and if for any reason I can't do this for my horse, perhaps I might be better of putting him back in the paddock and going to clean that kitchen, post that letter, see what that darn dog is doing!!!  I can come back to my horse when I  can gift him with my full attention.  

As far as how does my horse communicate when he doesn't understand something...they are all so different, it can go from a tense muscle in one horse to (it used to be) a complete 'taking over' from another, to just looking at me with a funny expression on their face.  I have learnt to read my horses by making a vast number of mistakes and not getting killed by them!!!  I am not sure if this helps the original post but its all just a thought.

Best Wishes

Sam the First

Cyrus44
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 Posted: Sat Jul 14th, 2007 10:42 pm
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I have begun reading the birdie book, so as yet I do not know if the human has a birdie.

But the thought that sprung to my mind was "my marbles" if I lose my marbles, I am not much use( referring to my brain and thinking).

2 days ago, I was looking forward to lessons, yet a twist of fate( as I arrived home I realised it was friday the 13th) maybe that made life more interesting.

We have finally had a lot of rain, and I took myself and my friend to lessons, the ground looked fine, hard under foot, but next thing you know my 4wd is sunk in mud, 2 horses attached etcect- we did get out , lucky I was earlyish.

Well " my birdie left home" and could not quite find its way back.

I rode around in lessons, but I was not at all in tune with anything. His ears laid flat back most of the lesson. I got them a bit happier, but I was too focussed on my bogged float and the events of the morning.

When I first hopped on him, I said he feels a bit lame, and he rode ok , but the ears were not good.

I think his ears were really trying to tell me his shoulders were sore, as the next day. I was thinking he was just reacting to my stresss and bad day,but perhaps he was trying to tell me, but "my birdie" had flown the coop.  As he was very  unhappy and lame in his shoulder.

 

 

ShotenStar
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 Posted: Wed Jul 18th, 2007 06:43 pm
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This concept of the 'human birdie', or being fully present and aware, is a lesson I keep offering to several of my high-maintenance / dysfunctional riding friends.  On too many rides to count, they have had problems (bucking, balking, bolting), where I saw the problem building in the horse and tried to call it to the rider's attention, only to have the rider continue to babble on-and-on-and-on about whatever the fuss of the moment was ... giving no mind to the horse and what the horse was saying.  Then they get dumped and are angry at the horse for 'being bad'. 

Of course, these are the same friends who have traffic accidents, lock themselves out of the house, flood the basement with spigots not turned off, etc, etc, etc .... all because they are never fully present and aware of what they are doing. 

Once upon a time, I used to intervene and monitor their behaviors, becoming the resident nag about all such safety-related things.  Now I just watch, make sure my own 'stuff' is in order, and let them fail.  I finally learned that I can not teach them awareness -- they must teach themselves.

*star*

Cyrus44
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 Posted: Thu Jul 19th, 2007 12:23 am
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I guess like deb, and her lessons with Ray, and her learning journey, they model the things.

Sooner or later  the other person may begin to ask, why is they can do those things so easily, and I struggle, but often they do not see it. As we reply " but thats the way I have always done it, etcetc"

In thinking about my getting bogged, that day. I talked myself into it, by saying to my friend, as we drove through the gate," gee I hope I do not need my 4 WD to get through that" next thing you know, I did.

 


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