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Cane - Grade TWH
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hurleycane
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Joined: Wed Apr 9th, 2008
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 Posted: Mon May 19th, 2008 08:52 pm
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Thank you again Dr Deb for your incredible teachings and style.  From reading your articles and book, I know it came from dedicated hard work and love, not to mention study under the masters.  Your insights are spot on.  And, I think you may be right  - I am wickedly attached to this horse.  He has led me down a great path of discovery. 

In another thread, I mentioned that Cane starred as an example of "what not to buy" in a clinic.  The participants were encouraged to scrutinize him for confo points both good and bad and described what they liked and did not like and indeed were shown to look past the pretty.   He put a lot of pretty on them. 

Below is a pic of my grandson (non-equestrian) sitting on Cane.  The angle of the picture does mask his issues a little  & we do have him shod to raise his heels and relieve some of the stress on the suspensories.  Cane is a Grade TWH with structural challenges: bilateral UPF, suspensory failure and possibly coon footed with contracted/sheared heels.  He was and is "sound" so to speak in that he is not in pain.  The Vet who diagnosed the desmitis strongly suggested he not be ridden.  So Cane is pastured 12 hours each day. 

Since this picture was taken, his pasture time has cost him muscle mass.  Due to this lack of fitness and the deep sugar sand from our recent drought, Cane has recently had significant bouts with his UPF.  So I am thinking some slow, non-percussive ground work on firm terra cotta is in order for him.  Maybe a 'working walk" with no gaiting in long lines would be best?  Possibly working up to negotiating ground poles and stuff to keep him focused.    

I appreciate any feed back on this wonderful horse and hope to obtain and post current pics soon.  

Attachment: Cane_n_Ryan.jpg (Downloaded 187 times)

Last edited on Tue May 20th, 2008 04:50 am by hurleycane

hurleycane
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 Posted: Tue May 20th, 2008 04:30 am
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Here we go  -  pics of Cane from tonight.   The reset was within the past week.   The effort here was to "stand him up" and support the pasterns.  Additional goal was to correct as much as possible the imbalance in the front.  So his heels are long and he is sporting caulks for extra lift.  His backs are about as good as it gets for him - short and steep.  There is yet much room  for improvement on his front feet.  Other than ataxic movement on the right hind, he is not sore or lame.  The ataxia is rather then flex at the stifle, he swings the leg out and forward  with an extra up and forward reach just before he places the foot (like he is looking for the ground).   

Sorry about the blur on the full body shot.




 

Left front:





 

Right front:


   


 

Medial View - Left hind full weight bearing:






Medial View Right Hind full weight bearing:




 

View from the front:



 

Posterior Vier of Both Fronts:



 

Left Front:



 

 

Right Front:

 



DrDeb
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 Posted: Wed May 21st, 2008 05:47 am
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Hurleycane -- Please go over to the "photos of Julian" thread for series of photos of my own horse, and general discussion regarding the orthopedic orientation that should be present in all trimming and shoeing. -- Dr. Deb

hurleycane
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 Posted: Wed May 21st, 2008 08:05 am
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Yes, Dr Deb you are absolutely correct in every way on what is going on with Cane and what I need to do for him.  What I have pictured here is a tremendous improvement over what he had 4 weeks ago with another farrier.  I know your critique of where we need to proceed with him will be infinitely helpful.

Oh, the things I could say about this very fine, nice, and dignified horse!  Suffice to say he is the lead in any herd, extremely polite, very responsive and always vigilant in his observations.  I know he will appreciate the lessons I am getting here.

I will update as he comes along.   

Thank you so much!

~Mary Ann

 


 


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