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Significance of the Rhomboid
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MelindaBell
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 Posted: Mon Apr 10th, 2017 07:01 pm
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Dr Deb in your discussion at Jodys house Oct 2016 you had discussed the importance/significance of the Rhomboid. Would you please discuss that again?
Thank you in advance

DrDeb
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 Posted: Tue Apr 11th, 2017 03:58 am
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Melinda, please ask a more specific question about it. Why do you want a review? -- Dr. Deb

MelindaBell
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 Posted: Tue Apr 11th, 2017 04:45 pm
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I remember you speaking of the rhomboid and its importance. Lately when working on horses I have come across alot of tight rhomboids. My head horse in particular is very tight. I am curious if this will also cause back pain.
(I am not a good note taker therefore this was not in my notes)

DrDeb
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 Posted: Tue Apr 11th, 2017 06:33 pm
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Melinda, by 'head horse' I suppose you mean the horse ridden by the person who ropes the cattle's head in the sport of team roping?

And if that's correct, then I expect that your heading horse works in a tiedown of some type?

We'll go from there in getting you to answer questions which will clarify your own question to yourself, letting you discover the right answers. So the first question is pretty simple -- what exact type of tiedown does the horse work in? -- Dr. Deb

MelindaBell
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 Posted: Tue Apr 11th, 2017 09:56 pm
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yes you are correct he is a team roping head horse. He is 11 and I've owned him for a year. He is ridden in a tie down when I rope on him. I use a rope tie down. When I exercise him I do not use a tie down, I am working on head set with just a snaffle or a lifter style bit. I work on both leads, flexing thru the rib cage, head set, and "speed control".

MelindaBell
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 Posted: Tue Apr 11th, 2017 10:01 pm
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also many horses that I have worked on lately have tight rhomboids.... I just remember you saying something about the importance of the rhomboid and what other issues can arise if its tight.

DrDeb
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 Posted: Wed Apr 12th, 2017 12:14 am
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Melinda, what's so wonderful about your writing in just at this time is that it marks the beginning of your being able to notice things that you never noticed before -- as a side effect of your having attended our class.

When we were little kids, my younger brother and I used to play a game that we invented called "never muchly noticed that before." How you played it was, you leaned back in your chair and you looked up at the ceiling, where there might have been a bit of spiderweb, an odd spot of discolored paint, a crack in the plaster, a small dent in the housing to the ceiling light. And Player no. 1 would point to it and say, "I never muchly noticed that before!" -- and then we would giggle, because, obviously, it had been there all along, but every time we had looked prior to that moment, we had not SEEN.

I admit, we were wierd kids, but I think the story does illustrate the position a lot of students wake up at a certain point to find themselves in: they've been around horses for years, but "never muchly noticed" a whole lot of things that have been there all along. As the saying goes, if they'd'a been a snake, they'd'a bit you. And that is exactly why I offer the classes, clinics, seminars, horsemanship rides, and this Forum: to provoke you to play that exact same "noticing" game with me (and not get bitten).

Now, as you know, my teaching method is to encourage you to figure out the answer yourself, and I do this by asking you to answer questions which I try to frame in such a manner as to draw the right line of thinking out of you. Be aware that, no more than there were in our class, there is never an intention on my part to ask a "trick" question (I do sometimes ask trick questions, but I always announce that they ARE trick questions so that you're alerted ahead of time that the answer isn't going to be perhaps what you might have thought). But there will be no trick questions here.

Now, you have said that you're not a particularly good note-taker and you know, I did notice that when you were in class. You seemed to think that most of the answers and insights were in fact going to be found somewhere inside your smartphone, and I noticed that you spent a lot of time (sitting right at the back there as you did), neither looking at nor listening with any care, to me. So it's not surprising that this question is bugging you now -- because not only have you had the dawning of actual curiosity -- the curiosity of a child, the only kind that's any good or ever counts for anything -- but you are also about to discover that the Teacher is not going to do your work for you. And that is because it is not any teacher's responsibility to see to it that you learn anything. The teacher's job is to present the material as clearly as possible: to expose you to it. What you do with that opportunity is entirely up to you.

You do have quite a bit of resources that will assist you in answering this next question: one or more books of equine anatomy, which you were asked during class to purchase if you did not already own at least one; and the thick package of handout material which I gave you during class. Further, you have all my opus in various magazines which you can go get: for this question I particularly recommend the survey article I did for The Eclectic Horseman magazine over a year ago on the biomechanical effects of tiedowns.

So here's the question, and it's a triple actually:

(1) Where does the rhomboideus cervicalis (the "rhomboid muscle of the neck" or "the neck part of the rhomboideus muscle") originate? And where does it insert?

(2) When a muscle contracts, do the origin and insertion of that muscle move closer together or farther apart?

(3) What is "isometric" exercise?

Keep your answers short and directly to the point. As I've advised Shea and Capparella in their recent dialogues with me in the posts just above this thread, stick strictly to answering ONLY what was asked, in the confidence (once again) that these are very straightforward questions designed to set up your understanding. -- Dr. Deb





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