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Melissa Pawluk
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 Posted: Thu Oct 11th, 2007 01:33 am
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 I have a two-year-old warmblood filly.  Her job in life is to grow up strong and as sound as possible.  She has been turned out day and night all summer and has been doing very well.  A few days ago I noticed a real small amount of swelling at the top of her back left fetlock joint.  I have been cold hosing it and I brought them into the small paddock.  I thought since she was not sore and there was little if any heat is was probably not much of anything, maybe she just banged it.  I now have her on stall rest and I am cold hosing and using absorbine until the vet can come check it.  It looks allot like a wind puff.  It seems less firm and distributed than a normal bang would cause. She is not sore as far as I can tell and no heat? The swelling does seem to almost disappear after cold hosing and absorbine while she is resting but then is pops up again. I am waiting to hear from the vet (she was going to call tonight but didn't) but they said the soonest appointment will be next Wednesday.  Any suggestions? I have never had any experience with wind puffs but my friends Peruvian has them and this looks very similar.  I am very concerned and want to be sure that I do every thing humanely possible to help this beautiful filly have the longest soundest life possible.  I would also like to know if it is a wind puff how detrimental this would be to an upper level dressage or jumper career later in life for this mare. 
I attended 2 Josh Nichol clinics this year.  Great stuff!

Last edited on Thu Oct 18th, 2007 02:57 am by Melissa Pawluk

Julie
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 Posted: Mon Oct 15th, 2007 06:19 am
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Hi this is not much help but I also am wondering about wind galls or (puffs). My horse had none to my knowledge about a month ago, they appeared on hind feet about 2 weeks ago and then today on front aswell.  We have had a lot of rain so the ground is soft my thinking was that they came when on hard ground.  I have not ridden this horse at all hard.  We are working on twirling and alot of walk that kind of thing. Any ideas would be welcome. Thanks  Cathie

Melissa Pawluk
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 Posted: Tue Oct 16th, 2007 07:19 pm
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Hi Julie,

I may not be much help as I am not an expert on this either.  But I have been doing a lot of research on it and one possible cause as I have read is deep footing.  If you have had a lot of rain and your paddock is real muddy this might be having an effect.  I am having my vet out tomorrow and getting x-rays.  My mares puff seems to be associated with the fetlock joint effusion according to many of the articles I have read.  It sounds like once they are there they are permanent so if I were you I would be limiting turnout until I had spoken with my vet.   That’s what I have done anyway.  Let me know how you make out.  I am just starting to sift through this stuff to.  How Junky.

Melissa

Julie
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 Posted: Wed Oct 17th, 2007 01:34 am
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Hi Melissa, thanks for your input.  These are also to do with the fetlock effusion which I believe is less serious than the other.  The equine physio was just here and she suggested  checking levels on foot trim also limit uneven ground. It certainly is muddy here so perhaps that as contributed as you say.

Good luck and thanks Cathie

Melissa Pawluk
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 Posted: Wed Oct 17th, 2007 06:13 am
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Hi Cathie
Can you clarify? What does levels "levels on foot trim" mean?

 Melissa

Julie
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 Posted: Wed Oct 17th, 2007 08:05 pm
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Hi Melissa, when you pick up the hoof and rest the fetlock joint in your hand and allow the hoof to fall naturally, look down to see the whole surface of hoof that would be  in contact with the ground. Check to see one side or heel is not higher than other. Am ofcourse just investigating not claiming to know anything.

Cathie

Melissa Pawluk
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 Posted: Thu Oct 18th, 2007 02:56 am
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Last edited on Fri Jul 4th, 2008 09:22 pm by Melissa Pawluk


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